Ch. 5 - Membrane DynamicsWorksheetSee all chapters
All Chapters
Ch. 1 - Introduction to Physiology
Ch. 2 - Molecules and Molecular Interactions
Ch. 3 - Cells and Tissues
Ch. 4 - Cell Metabolism: Bioenergetics, Enzymes, and Respiration
Ch. 5 - Membrane Dynamics
Ch. 6 - Cell Communication
Ch. 7 - Integumentary System
Ch. 8 - Bone and Cartilage
Ch. 9 - Skeletal System
Ch. 10 - Joints
Ch. 11 - Muscles
Ch. 12 - The Nervous System I: Neurons and Neuronal Networks
Ch. 13 - The Nervous System II: The Central Nervous System
Ch. 14 - The Autonomic Nervous System
Ch. 15 - Sensory Physiology
Ch. 16 - The Endocrine System
Ch. 17 - Cardiovascular Physiology I: The Heart
Ch. 18 - Cardiovascular Physiology II: Blood, Blood Vessels, Circulation, and Exchange
Ch. 19 - The Urinary System
Ch. 20 - Respiratory Physiology
Ch. 21 - Acid-Base Balance-- Controlling Blood pH
Ch. 22 - Introduction to the Immune System
Ch. 23 The Lymphatic System
Ch. 23 - The Digestive System
Ch. 24 - Regulation of Metabolism and Energy Balance
Ch. 25 - Human Sexual Reproduction and Development

Concept #2: Dissociation and Osmolarity

Concept #3: Hyper- vs. Hypo- vs. Isoosmotic

Concept #5: Osmotic Pressure

Concept #7: Isoosmotic But Not Isotonic

Practice: An undergraduate playing around in lab combines 1 L of pure water, 150 mmols of glucose, and 150 mmols of KCl. Assuming complete dissociation, which of the following is the osmolarity of the resulting solution?

Practice: Filtrate inside of the nephron (part of the kidney) has an osmolarity of 500 mOsM. Fluid outside of the nephron has an osmolarity of 750 mOsM. Which of the following describes the fluid inside of the nephron relative to the fluid outside of the nephron.

Practice: Filtrate inside of the nephron (part of the kidney) has an osmolarity of 500 mOsM. Fluid outside of the nephron has an osmolarity of 750 mOsM. Assume that water can move between the compartments, but solute cannot. Which compartment is hypertonic, and what is going to happen to the volume of that compartment?

Practice: The cytosol of red blood cells is approximately 300 mOsM, mostly from NaCl. You place the RBC in a extracellular solution of 600 mM sucrose. RBC membranes are not permeable to NaCl or sucrose. Circle the answer.