Ch. 5 - Membrane DynamicsSee all chapters
All Chapters
Ch. 1 - Introduction to Physiology
Ch. 2 - Molecules and Molecular Interactions
Ch. 3 - Cells and Tissues
Ch. 4 - Cell Metabolism: Bioenergetics, Enzymes, and Respiration
Ch. 5 - Membrane Dynamics
Ch. 6 - Cell Communication
Ch. 7 - Integumentary System
Ch. 8 - Bone and Cartilage
Ch. 9 - Skeletal System
Ch. 10 - Joints
Ch. 11 - Muscles
Ch. 12 - The Nervous System I: Neurons and Neuronal Networks
Ch. 13 - The Nervous System II: The Central Nervous System
Ch. 14 - The Autonomic Nervous System
Ch. 15 - Sensory Physiology
Ch. 16 - The Endocrine System
Ch. 17 - Cardiovascular Physiology I: The Heart
Ch. 18 - Cardiovascular Physiology II: Blood, Blood Vessels, Circulation, and Exchange
Ch. 19 - The Urinary System
Ch. 20 - Respiratory Physiology
Ch. 21 - Acid-Base Balance-- Controlling Blood pH
Ch. 22 - Introduction to the Immune System
Ch. 23 The Lymphatic System
Ch. 23 - The Digestive System
Ch. 24 - Regulation of Metabolism and Energy Balance
Ch. 25 - Human Sexual Reproduction and Development

Concept #1: Diffusion, Qualitatively

Concept #2: Diffusion, Quantitatively-- Fick's Law

Practice: The walls of capillaries—where all of the exchange between the blood and body takes place—are made of endothelial cells. Tight junctions are proteins that hold adjacent endothelial cells together and prevent too much from crossing. After injury, damaged cells release molecules that loosen tight junctions. Which variable in Fick’s Law is affected by injury?

Practice: The walls of capillaries—where all of the exchange between the blood and body takes place—are made of endothelial cells. Tight junctions are proteins that hold adjacent endothelial cells together and prevent too much from crossing. After injury, damaged cells release molecules that loosen tight junctions. How will this affect flux (J)?