Inelastic Collisions Video Lessons

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Problem: The drawing shows a collision between two pucks on an air-hockey table. Puck A has a mass of 3.5 kg and is moving along the x axis with a velocity of +5.5 m/s. It makes a collision with puck B, which has a mass of 6 kg and is initially at rest. After the collision, the two pucks fly apart with the angles shown in the drawing.(a) Find the final speed of:puck A:  m/spuck B:  m/s(b) Find the kinetic energy of the A+B system:before the collision:  Jafter the collision:  JWhat type of collision is this?

FREE Expert Solution

In this problem, we're going to use the law of conservation of linear momentum. 

Momentum:

p=mv, where p is momentum, m is mass, and v is velocity. 

We now write the law of conservation of linear momentum in the x-direction as:

mAv0A=mAvfAcos(65°)+mBvfBcos(37°)

In the y-direction, we have:

0=mAvfAsin(65°)-mBvfBsin(37°)

Kinetic energy:

K=12mv2

We can solve for vfB from the equation of conservation of linear momentum in the y-direction equation as:

mBvfBsin(37°)=mAvfAsin(65°)vfB=mAvfAsin(65°)mBsin(37°)

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Problem Details

The drawing shows a collision between two pucks on an air-hockey table. Puck A has a mass of 3.5 kg and is moving along the x axis with a velocity of +5.5 m/s. It makes a collision with puck B, which has a mass of 6 kg and is initially at rest. After the collision, the two pucks fly apart with the angles shown in the drawing.(a) Find the final speed of:
puck A:  m/s
puck B:  m/s

(b) Find the kinetic energy of the A+B system:
before the collision:  J
after the collision:  J
What type of collision is this?

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