Ch 35: Particle-Wave DualitySee all chapters
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Ch 01: Units & Vectors
Ch 02: 1D Motion (Kinematics)
Ch 03: 2D Motion (Projectile Motion)
Ch 04: Intro to Forces (Dynamics)
Ch 05: Friction, Inclines, Systems
Ch 06: Centripetal Forces & Gravitation
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Ch 31: Geometric Optics
Ch 32: Wave Optics
Ch 34: Special Relativity
Ch 35: Particle-Wave Duality
Ch 36: Atomic Structure
Ch 37: Nuclear Physics
Ch 38: Quantum Mechanics

Particle-Wave Duality

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Particle-Wave Duality
Additional Problems
An electron has de Broglie wavelength 60.0 nm. What is the wavelength of a photon that has the same energy as the kinetic energy of this electron?
When a photon of light scatters off of a free electron that is initially stationary, the wavelength of the photon (a) remains the same (b) decreases (c) increases
What is the wavelength of a photon with energy 19.0 eV?
How many photons of blue light (with a wavelength of 400 nm) does it take to create a beam of light with an energy of 1 J?
A metal has a work function of 2.9 eV. If light of wavelength 400 nm, in air, is shown on the surface of the metal, what is the energy of the ejected electrons?
A 100 W source of red light at 600 nm is shown on a metal with a work function of 4.2 eV. How many electrons are released by the metal every second the light shines on it?
In beta decay, a down quark decays into an up quark, releasing a W  - boson. There isn't enough energy in the different in rest mass between the two quarks, so the W- boson produced is known as a "virtual particle" -- a particle produced by "borrowing" energy for a short amount of time. If the mass of the W- boson is 80.4 GeV/c2, how long can it exist for? 
We want to measure the wavelength and position of a photon simultaneously. Assume the wavelength of the photon is 600 nm, and it is measured with an accuracy of Δλ / λ = 10-6. What is the minimum uncertainty in the position measurement of the photon, Δx?
The maximum wavelength of light that will produce photoelectrons from a certain surface is 600 nm. \Vhat is the maximum kinetic energy of the photoelectrons produced from the same surface when light of wavelength 400 nm is used?
What minimum frequency of light is needed to eject electrons from a metal whose work function is 4.0 eV?
When light of wavelength 200 nm shines on a certain metal surface, the maximum kinetic energy of the photoelectrons is 3.6 eV. What is the maximum wavelength of light that will produce photoelectrons from this surface?
A photon with wavelength 0.02680 nm strikes a free electron that is initially at rest. The photon is scattered at an angle of 30.0° from its original direction. What is the energy of the scattered photon?
A photon with wavelength 0.02680 nm strikes a free electron that is initially at rest. The photon is scattered at an angle of 30.0° from its original direction. What is the de Broglie wavelength of the electron after its collision with the photon?
Electrons are fired through a double slit with a separation distance of 2.5 mm, onto a 5 mm wide screen that is placed 1.5 m behind the double slits. What is the minimum momentum of the electrons such that any diffraction can be seen? Hint: for diffraction to be seen, the m = 1 bright spots must be captured by the screen. 
In a photoelectron experiment with a particular surface, light of intensity  I0 produces photoelectrons with maximum kinetic energy 2.0 eV. What is the maximum kinetic energy of the photoelectrons produced from this surface with light of the same wavelength if the intensity of the light is doubled?  A) 1.0 eV B) 2.0 eV C) 3.0 eV D) 4.0 eV E) 6.0 eV F) 8.0 eV G) none of the above answers
What is the wavelength of an electron of energy 19.0 eV?
For a certain metal surface, the maximum wavelength of light that will produce photoelectrons form this surface is 450 nm. What is the maximum kinetic energy of the photoelectrons that are produced when light of wavelength 350 nm shines on this surface?
A photon strikes a free electron that is initially at rest. After the photon has scattered from the electron, the photon has wavelength 0.0860 nm and is traveling backwards at an angle of 180° from its original direction. What was the wavelength of the photon before it scattered from the electron? (Express your answer in nm.)
A photon strikes a free electron that is initially at rest. After the photon has scattered from the electron, the photon has wavelength 0.0860 nm and is traveling backwards at an angle of 180° from its original direction. What is the de Broglie wavelength of the electron immediately after the proton has scattered from it? (Express your answer in nm.)