Ch. 19 - Aldehydes and Ketones: Nucleophilic AdditionWorksheetSee all chapters
All Chapters
Ch. 1 - A Review of General Chemistry
Ch. 2 - Molecular Representations
Ch. 3 - Acids and Bases
Ch. 4 - Alkanes and Cycloalkanes
Ch. 5 - Chirality
Ch. 6 - Thermodynamics and Kinetics
Ch. 7 - Substitution Reactions
Ch. 8 - Elimination Reactions
Ch. 9 - Alkenes and Alkynes
Ch. 10 - Addition Reactions
Ch. 11 - Radical Reactions
Ch. 12 - Alcohols, Ethers, Epoxides and Thiols
Ch. 13 - Alcohols and Carbonyl Compounds
Ch. 14 - Synthetic Techniques
Ch. 15 - Analytical Techniques: IR, NMR, Mass Spect
Ch. 16 - Conjugated Systems
Ch. 17 - Aromaticity
Ch. 18 - Reactions of Aromatics: EAS and Beyond
Ch. 19 - Aldehydes and Ketones: Nucleophilic Addition
Ch. 20 - Carboxylic Acid Derivatives: NAS
Ch. 21 - Enolate Chemistry: Reactions at the Alpha-Carbon
Ch. 22 - Condensation Chemistry
Ch. 23 - Amines
Ch. 24 - Carbohydrates
Ch. 25 - Phenols
Ch. 26 - Amino Acids, Peptides, and Proteins
Sections
Naming Aldehydes
Naming Ketones
Oxidizing and Reducing Agents
Oxidation of Alcohols
Ozonolysis
DIBAL
Alkyne Hydration
Nucleophilic Addition
Cyanohydrin
Organometallics on Ketones
Overview of Nucleophilic Addition of Solvents
Hydrates
Hemiacetal
Acetal
Acetal Protecting Group
Thioacetal
Imine vs Enamine
Addition of Amine Derivatives
Wolff Kishner Reduction
Baeyer-Villiger Oxidation
Acid Chloride to Ketone
Nitrile to Ketone
Wittig Reaction
Ketone and Aldehyde Synthesis Reactions
Additional Practice
Physical Properties of Ketones and Aldehydes
Multi-Functionalized Carbonyl Nomenclauture
Catalytic Reduction of Carbonyls
Tollens’s Test
Fehling’s Test 
Alkyne Hydroboration to Yield Aldehydes
Nucleophilic Addition Reactivity
Strecker Synthesis
Synthesis Involving Acetals
Reduction of Carbonyls to Alkanes
Clemmensen vs Wolff-Kischner
Baeyer-Villiger Oxidation Synthesis
Weinreb Ketone Synthesis
Wittig Retrosynthesis
Horner–Wadsworth–Emmons Reaction
Carbonyl Missing Reagent
Carbonyl Hydrolysis
Carbonyl Synthesis
Carbonyl Retrosynthesis
Reactions of Ketenes
Ketene Synthesis
Additional Guides
Acetal and Hemiacetal

Concept #1: Box-Out Method and Full-Mechanism

Practice: Determine the carbonyl and ylide that formed the following product. 

Additional Problems
Provide the structure for X, Y and Z, for the following reaction sequence.
In the Wittig reaction of compound 1, several possible intermediates are shown. Indicate the order in which these intermediates would appear during the conversion of 1 into 2. 1) 1 → I → IV → III → 2 2) 1 → IV → II → 2 3) 1 → IV → III → I → 2 4) 1 → I → III → 2 5) 1 → I → IV → 2
Complete the following reaction supplying the missing product and showing correct regio- and stereochemistry where applicable. If a racemic or diastereomeric mixture forms show all stereoisomers; if no reaction takes place, write N.R.
What is the product of the reaction sequence below? a. 2-methyl-1-hexene b. 2,3-dimethyl-2-pentene c. 2-methyl-2-hexene d. 3-methyl-1-hexene e. none of these
Reactions in context: Following is a Wittig reaction used in the published synthesis of a pharmaceutical called Ifetroban used to treat hypertension. Draw the product of the reaction.
Provide both the reagents (in square boxes) and the product (rounded box) for this synthesis. (Note, that a second reagent may be required in the square boxes. For example, the acid step of a Grignard addition.) In the rounded rectangle, draw the structure of the compound from the first reaction.
Predict the product of the following reaction. Assume an acid quench if necessary.
For the reaction or series of reaction below, draw the structure of the appropriate compound in the box provided. Indicate stereochemistry where it is pertinent.
Provide a complete mechanism for the following transformation.
Which reagent sequence will effect the transformation shown?
What is the product of this reaction sequence?
What is the product of this reaction sequence?
Predict the product for the following reaction.   
Texas two-step: Provide both the reagents (in square boxes) and the product (rounded box) for these synthesis. In some of the steps, there is more than one correct method. (Note, that a second reagent may be required in the square boxes. For example, the acid step of a Grignard addition-please include it.)
In the Wittig reaction of compound  1, several possible intermediates are shown. Indicate the order in which these intermediates would appear during the conversion of 1 into 2.
Consider the following reaction, circle the statement below that is true.
What is the product of the following reaction?
Draw the structure of the products from this reaction and circle the major. (Hint: Triphenylphosphine oxide is a by-product.) 
Click the "draw structure" button to activate the drawing utility. Draw one of the organic products formed in the following reaction.
What is the major organic product obtained from the following reaction?