Ch. 10 - Addition ReactionsSee all chapters
All Chapters
Ch. 1 - A Review of General Chemistry
Ch. 2 - Molecular Representations
Ch. 3 - Acids and Bases
Ch. 4 - Alkanes and Cycloalkanes
Ch. 5 - Chirality
Ch. 6 - Thermodynamics and Kinetics
Ch. 7 - Substitution Reactions
Ch. 8 - Elimination Reactions
Ch. 9 - Alkenes and Alkynes
Ch. 10 - Addition Reactions
Ch. 11 - Radical Reactions
Ch. 12 - Alcohols, Ethers, Epoxides and Thiols
Ch. 13 - Alcohols and Carbonyl Compounds
Ch. 14 - Synthetic Techniques
Ch. 15 - Analytical Techniques: IR, NMR, Mass Spect
Ch. 16 - Conjugated Systems
Ch. 17 - Aromaticity
Ch. 18 - Reactions of Aromatics: EAS and Beyond
Ch. 19 - Aldehydes and Ketones: Nucleophilic Addition
Ch. 20 - Carboxylic Acid Derivatives: NAS
Ch. 21 - Enolate Chemistry: Reactions at the Alpha-Carbon
Ch. 22 - Condensation Chemistry
Ch. 23 - Amines
Ch. 24 - Carbohydrates
Ch. 25 - Phenols
Ch. 26 - Amino Acids, Peptides, and Proteins

Solution: Organic chemistry is a very creative science because there are so many different reactions known that often we are only limited by our imaginations. For example, the same starting alkene can be converted to the different products listed. Deduce the identity of the starting alkene, and write its structure in the box labeled "Starting Alkene". Fill in the boxes containing arrows with the reagents required to produce the given products.

Problem

Organic chemistry is a very creative science because there are so many different reactions known that often we are only limited by our imaginations. For example, the same starting alkene can be converted to the different products listed. Deduce the identity of the starting alkene, and write its structure in the box labeled "Starting Alkene". Fill in the boxes containing arrows with the reagents required to produce the given products.