Ch. 8 - Elimination ReactionsSee all chapters
All Chapters
Ch. 1 - A Review of General Chemistry
Ch. 2 - Molecular Representations
Ch. 3 - Acids and Bases
Ch. 4 - Alkanes and Cycloalkanes
Ch. 5 - Chirality
Ch. 6 - Thermodynamics and Kinetics
Ch. 7 - Substitution Reactions
Ch. 8 - Elimination Reactions
Ch. 9 - Alkenes and Alkynes
Ch. 10 - Addition Reactions
Ch. 11 - Radical Reactions
Ch. 12 - Alcohols, Ethers, Epoxides and Thiols
Ch. 13 - Alcohols and Carbonyl Compounds
Ch. 14 - Synthetic Techniques
Ch. 15 - Analytical Techniques: IR, NMR, Mass Spect
Ch. 16 - Conjugated Systems
Ch. 17 - Aromaticity
Ch. 18 - Reactions of Aromatics: EAS and Beyond
Ch. 19 - Aldehydes and Ketones: Nucleophilic Addition
Ch. 20 - Carboxylic Acid Derivatives: NAS
Ch. 21 - Enolate Chemistry: Reactions at the Alpha-Carbon
Ch. 22 - Condensation Chemistry
Ch. 23 - Amines
Ch. 24 - Carbohydrates
Ch. 25 - Phenols
Ch. 26 - Amino Acids, Peptides, and Proteins

Solution: True/False. Identify the statements as either True or False.    Reduction of an alkyne to an alkene with sodium metal in liquid ammonia is a partial radical mechanism. In polar protic solvents a selenide anion (Se-2) is a stronger nucleophile as compared to a sulfide anion (S-2). The leaving group and the departing hydrogen in an E2 elimination reaction has to be on the same side. Halogens have lower priority as compared to alkenes in IUPAC naming system. The rate of a SN1 reaction increases with increasing carbocation stability. Sodium hydroxide is a strong base and can be used to deprotonate terminal alkynes in a 100% yield. Carbocations form tight ion-pairs with halide anion. In SN2 reactions the rate-determining step involves two molecules. Iodine is a better leaving group than fluorine because iodine is more polarizable than fluorine.  Vinylic carbocations can undergo carbocation rearrangement.

Problem

True/False. Identify the statements as either True or False. 

 

Reduction of an alkyne to an alkene with sodium metal in liquid ammonia is a partial radical mechanism.

In polar protic solvents a selenide anion (Se-2) is a stronger nucleophile as compared to a sulfide anion (S-2).

The leaving group and the departing hydrogen in an E2 elimination reaction has to be on the same side.

Halogens have lower priority as compared to alkenes in IUPAC naming system.

The rate of a SN1 reaction increases with increasing carbocation stability.

Sodium hydroxide is a strong base and can be used to deprotonate terminal alkynes in a 100% yield.

Carbocations form tight ion-pairs with halide anion.

In SN2 reactions the rate-determining step involves two molecules.

Iodine is a better leaving group than fluorine because iodine is more polarizable than fluorine. 

Vinylic carbocations can undergo carbocation rearrangement.