Ch. 15 - Analytical Techniques: IR, NMR, Mass SpectWorksheetSee all chapters
All Chapters
Ch. 1 - A Review of General Chemistry
Ch. 2 - Molecular Representations
Ch. 3 - Acids and Bases
Ch. 4 - Alkanes and Cycloalkanes
Ch. 5 - Chirality
Ch. 6 - Thermodynamics and Kinetics
Ch. 7 - Substitution Reactions
Ch. 8 - Elimination Reactions
Ch. 9 - Alkenes and Alkynes
Ch. 10 - Addition Reactions
Ch. 11 - Radical Reactions
Ch. 12 - Alcohols, Ethers, Epoxides and Thiols
Ch. 13 - Alcohols and Carbonyl Compounds
Ch. 14 - Synthetic Techniques
Ch. 15 - Analytical Techniques: IR, NMR, Mass Spect
Ch. 16 - Conjugated Systems
Ch. 17 - Aromaticity
Ch. 18 - Reactions of Aromatics: EAS and Beyond
Ch. 19 - Aldehydes and Ketones: Nucleophilic Addition
Ch. 20 - Carboxylic Acid Derivatives: NAS
Ch. 21 - Enolate Chemistry: Reactions at the Alpha-Carbon
Ch. 22 - Condensation Chemistry
Ch. 23 - Amines
Ch. 24 - Carbohydrates
Ch. 25 - Phenols
Ch. 26 - Amino Acids, Peptides, and Proteins

Solution: When two substituents are on the same side of a ring skeleton, they are said to be cis, and when on opposite sides, trans (analogous to use of those terms with 1,2-disubstituted alkene isomers). Consider stereoisomeric forms of 1,2-cyclopentanediol (compounds having a five-membered ring and hydroxyl groups on two adjacent carbons that are cis in one isomer and trans in the other). At high dilution in CCl4, both isomers have an infrared absorption band at approximately 3626 cm-1 but only one isomer has a band at 3572 cm -1. (a) Assume for now that the cyclopentane ring is coplanar (the interesting actuality will be studied later) and then draw and label the two isomers using the wedge–dashed wedge method of depicting the OH groups.

Problem

When two substituents are on the same side of a ring skeleton, they are said to be cis, and when on opposite sides, trans (analogous to use of those terms with 1,2-disubstituted alkene isomers). Consider stereoisomeric forms of 1,2-cyclopentanediol (compounds having a five-membered ring and hydroxyl groups on two adjacent carbons that are cis in one isomer and trans in the other). At high dilution in CCl4, both isomers have an infrared absorption band at approximately 3626 cm-1 but only one isomer has a band at 3572 cm -1.

(a) Assume for now that the cyclopentane ring is coplanar (the interesting actuality will be studied later) and then draw and label the two isomers using the wedge–dashed wedge method of depicting the OH groups.