Ch. 1 - A Review of General ChemistryWorksheetSee all chapters
All Chapters
Ch. 1 - A Review of General Chemistry
Ch. 2 - Molecular Representations
Ch. 3 - Acids and Bases
Ch. 4 - Alkanes and Cycloalkanes
Ch. 5 - Chirality
Ch. 6 - Thermodynamics and Kinetics
Ch. 7 - Substitution Reactions
Ch. 8 - Elimination Reactions
Ch. 9 - Alkenes and Alkynes
Ch. 10 - Addition Reactions
Ch. 11 - Radical Reactions
Ch. 12 - Alcohols, Ethers, Epoxides and Thiols
Ch. 13 - Alcohols and Carbonyl Compounds
Ch. 14 - Synthetic Techniques
Ch. 15 - Analytical Techniques: IR, NMR, Mass Spect
Ch. 16 - Conjugated Systems
Ch. 17 - Aromaticity
Ch. 18 - Reactions of Aromatics: EAS and Beyond
Ch. 19 - Aldehydes and Ketones: Nucleophilic Addition
Ch. 20 - Carboxylic Acid Derivatives: NAS
Ch. 21 - Enolate Chemistry: Reactions at the Alpha-Carbon
Ch. 22 - Condensation Chemistry
Ch. 23 - Amines
Ch. 24 - Carbohydrates
Ch. 25 - Phenols
Ch. 26 - Amino Acids, Peptides, and Proteins

Solution: CL-20 and HMX are both powerful explosives. CL-20 produces a more powerful blast but is generally considered too shock-sensitive for practical use. HMX is significantly less sensitive and is used as a standard military explosive. When a 2:1 mixture of the two compounds is cocrystallized, the resulting explosive is expected to be more powerful than HMX alone, but with a sensitivity similar to HMX (Cryst. Growth Des. 2012, 12, 4311–4314). (b) Consider the lone pair of electrons on one of the nitrogen atoms within the ring(s) for either molecule. Is the lone pair localized or delocalized? 

Problem

CL-20 and HMX are both powerful explosives. CL-20 produces a more powerful blast but is generally considered too shock-sensitive for practical use. HMX is significantly less sensitive and is used as a standard military explosive. When a 2:1 mixture of the two compounds is cocrystallized, the resulting explosive is expected to be more powerful than HMX alone, but with a sensitivity similar to HMX (Cryst. Growth Des. 201212, 4311–4314)

(b) Consider the lone pair of electrons on one of the nitrogen atoms within the ring(s) for either molecule. Is the lone pair localized or delocalized?