Ch. 4 - Alkanes and CycloalkanesWorksheetSee all chapters
All Chapters
Ch. 1 - A Review of General Chemistry
Ch. 2 - Molecular Representations
Ch. 3 - Acids and Bases
Ch. 4 - Alkanes and Cycloalkanes
Ch. 5 - Chirality
Ch. 6 - Thermodynamics and Kinetics
Ch. 7 - Substitution Reactions
Ch. 8 - Elimination Reactions
Ch. 9 - Alkenes and Alkynes
Ch. 10 - Addition Reactions
Ch. 11 - Radical Reactions
Ch. 12 - Alcohols, Ethers, Epoxides and Thiols
Ch. 13 - Alcohols and Carbonyl Compounds
Ch. 14 - Synthetic Techniques
Ch. 15 - Analytical Techniques: IR, NMR, Mass Spect
Ch. 16 - Conjugated Systems
Ch. 17 - Aromaticity
Ch. 18 - Reactions of Aromatics: EAS and Beyond
Ch. 19 - Aldehydes and Ketones: Nucleophilic Addition
Ch. 20 - Carboxylic Acid Derivatives: NAS
Ch. 21 - Enolate Chemistry: Reactions at the Alpha-Carbon
Ch. 22 - Condensation Chemistry
Ch. 23 - Amines
Ch. 24 - Carbohydrates
Ch. 25 - Phenols
Ch. 26 - Amino Acids, Peptides, and Proteins

Solution: The following compound is an intermediate in the synthesis of a gelator, which is a compound capable of self-assembling to form a gel in an organic liquid (Soft Matter 2012, 8, 5486–5492).  (b) In Ch

Problem

The following compound is an intermediate in the synthesis of a gelator, which is a compound capable of self-assembling to form a gel in an organic liquid (Soft Matter 2012, 8, 5486–5492)

(b) In Chapter 4, we will learn that molecules generally rotate freely around single bonds, while rotation around double bonds is significantly restricted. Consider the four single bonds connecting the two rings in this structure. Two of them can rotate freely, while the other two cannot. Identify the two with restricted rotation and justify your answer by drawing resonance structures.