Ch. 2 - Molecular RepresentationsWorksheetSee all chapters
All Chapters
Ch. 1 - A Review of General Chemistry
Ch. 2 - Molecular Representations
Ch. 3 - Acids and Bases
Ch. 4 - Alkanes and Cycloalkanes
Ch. 5 - Chirality
Ch. 6 - Thermodynamics and Kinetics
Ch. 7 - Substitution Reactions
Ch. 8 - Elimination Reactions
Ch. 9 - Alkenes and Alkynes
Ch. 10 - Addition Reactions
Ch. 11 - Radical Reactions
Ch. 12 - Alcohols, Ethers, Epoxides and Thiols
Ch. 13 - Alcohols and Carbonyl Compounds
Ch. 14 - Synthetic Techniques
Ch. 15 - Analytical Techniques: IR, NMR, Mass Spect
Ch. 16 - Conjugated Systems
Ch. 17 - Aromaticity
Ch. 18 - Reactions of Aromatics: EAS and Beyond
Ch. 19 - Aldehydes and Ketones: Nucleophilic Addition
Ch. 20 - Carboxylic Acid Derivatives: NAS
Ch. 21 - Enolate Chemistry: Reactions at the Alpha-Carbon
Ch. 22 - Condensation Chemistry
Ch. 23 - Amines
Ch. 24 - Carbohydrates
Ch. 25 - Phenols
Ch. 26 - Amino Acids, Peptides, and Proteins

Solution: Epichlorohydrin (1) is an epoxide used in the production of plastic, epoxy glues, and resins (reactions of epoxides will be discussed in Chapter 14). When epichlorohydrin is treated with phenol (2), t

Problem

Epichlorohydrin (1) is an epoxide used in the production of plastic, epoxy glues, and resins (reactions of epoxides will be discussed in Chapter 14). When epichlorohydrin is treated with phenol (2), two products are formed (3 and 4). At room temperature, these liquid products are difficult to separate from each other, but upon heating, these compounds are easily separated from one another. Explain these observations (Tetrahedron 2006, 62, 10968–10979)