Ch. 22 - Condensation ChemistryWorksheetSee all chapters
All Chapters
Ch. 1 - A Review of General Chemistry
Ch. 2 - Molecular Representations
Ch. 3 - Acids and Bases
Ch. 4 - Alkanes and Cycloalkanes
Ch. 5 - Chirality
Ch. 6 - Thermodynamics and Kinetics
Ch. 7 - Substitution Reactions
Ch. 8 - Elimination Reactions
Ch. 9 - Alkenes and Alkynes
Ch. 10 - Addition Reactions
Ch. 11 - Radical Reactions
Ch. 12 - Alcohols, Ethers, Epoxides and Thiols
Ch. 13 - Alcohols and Carbonyl Compounds
Ch. 14 - Synthetic Techniques
Ch. 15 - Analytical Techniques: IR, NMR, Mass Spect
Ch. 16 - Conjugated Systems
Ch. 17 - Aromaticity
Ch. 18 - Reactions of Aromatics: EAS and Beyond
Ch. 19 - Aldehydes and Ketones: Nucleophilic Addition
Ch. 20 - Carboxylic Acid Derivatives: NAS
Ch. 21 - Enolate Chemistry: Reactions at the Alpha-Carbon
Ch. 22 - Condensation Chemistry
Ch. 23 - Amines
Ch. 24 - Carbohydrates
Ch. 25 - Phenols
Ch. 26 - Amino Acids, Peptides, and Proteins

The Michael Reaction is a 1,4-conjugate addition of an enone with an enolate and always forms 1,5-dicarbonyls.

Concept #1: General Reaction

Concept #2: General Mechanism

Practice: Determine the product in the following conjugated addition reaction. 

Practice: Determine the product in the following conjugated addition reaction. 

Practice: Determine the product in the following conjugated addition reaction

Additional Problems
Predict the products for the following transformations. When necessary indicate the major product and relative stereochemistry.
Predict the product of the following reaction.   
Predict the stepwise mechanism for the reaction shown below:   
Which mechanism best describes the conversion of  A into B?
Predict the product of the following reaction:  
Indicate the order in which the intermediates would appear during the conversion of   1 into 2. The asterisk (*) in the answers indicates the step where the quench is used.  a) 1 → III – * → II → 2 b) 1 – * →  IV → II → 2 c) 1 → II – * → 2 d) 1→ II → I – * → 2 e) 1 → V → III – * → 2
Which of the following is the direct product of a Michael reaction (1,4 addition of an enolate to a enone)?
Which is the major product of this reaction?
α, β, γ, δ unsaturated carbonyl compounds frequently react as shown below. Draw a mechanism for this reaction and give a good reason for why a nucleophile reacts with an alkene at all.  
Fill in the roles (abbreviated in parentheses) of the reactants in the boxes.  Which one is the Michael donor ( D)? Which one is the Michael acceptor ( A)?
Draw the organic product(s) for the following reaction. Indicate stereochemistry where appropriate. Assume an aqueous workup, when necessary. A reasonable answer may be “ No Reaction.”
Provide a detailed mechanism for the following transformation.
Predict the product(s) for the following reaction.
Complete the mechanism for the following Michael reaction. Be sure to show arrows to indicate movement of all electrons, write all lone pairs, all formal charges, and all the products for each step. Remember, I said all the products for each step. IF A NEW CHIRAL CENTER IS CREATED IN AN INTERMEDIATE OR THE PRODUCTS, MARK IT WITH AN ASTERISK AND LABEL AS "RACEMIC" IF RELEVANT. IN THE BOX BY EACH SET OF ARROWS, WRITE WHICH OF THE 4 MECHANISTIC ELEMENTS IS INDICATED IN EACH STEP OF YOUR MECHANISM (For example, "Add a proton").
What is the final product of the following reaction?
Complete the following reaction supplying the missing product and showing correct regio- and stereochemistry where applicable. If a racemic or diastereomeric mixture forms show all stereoisomers; if no reaction takes place, write N.R.
Determine the final product for the following reaction.    
What is the product of the following reaction?
What is the product of the following reaction?
What is the product of the following reaction?
Predict the stepwise mechanism for the reaction shown below:
Circle the major product for the following transformation. You may assume any neutral, acidic or basic work up conditions needed.
Complete the following reaction by drawing the structure of the principal organic product in the box. Draw the correct stereochemistry in the product where necessary. Be sure your product possesses the correct number of carbons and other atoms.