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Ch.16 - Aqueous Equilibrium WorksheetSee all chapters
All Chapters
Ch.1 - Intro to General Chemistry
Ch.2 - Atoms & Elements
Ch.3 - Chemical Reactions
BONUS: Lab Techniques and Procedures
BONUS: Mathematical Operations and Functions
Ch.4 - Chemical Quantities & Aqueous Reactions
Ch.5 - Gases
Ch.6 - Thermochemistry
Ch.7 - Quantum Mechanics
Ch.8 - Periodic Properties of the Elements
Ch.9 - Bonding & Molecular Structure
Ch.10 - Molecular Shapes & Valence Bond Theory
Ch.11 - Liquids, Solids & Intermolecular Forces
Ch.12 - Solutions
Ch.13 - Chemical Kinetics
Ch.14 - Chemical Equilibrium
Ch.15 - Acid and Base Equilibrium
Ch.16 - Aqueous Equilibrium
Ch. 17 - Chemical Thermodynamics
Ch.18 - Electrochemistry
Ch.19 - Nuclear Chemistry
Ch.20 - Organic Chemistry
Ch.22 - Chemistry of the Nonmetals
Ch.23 - Transition Metals and Coordination Compounds
Sections
Buffer
Acid and Base Titration Curves
Weak Acid Strong Base Titrations
Weak Base Strong Acid Titrations
Strong Acid Strong Base Titrations
Titrations of Diprotic and Polyprotic Acids
Ksp
Additional Guides
Henderson Hasselbalch Equation (IGNORE)

A diprotic or polyprotic buffer can be approached in a way similar to monoprotic buffers. The key difference is that multiple pKa values will be involved. 

Diprotic & Polyprotic Buffers

Concept #1: Diprotic & Polyprotic Buffers

Concept #2: Diprotic & Polyprotic Buffers

Concept #3: Diprotic & Polyprotic Buffers

Example #1: Calculate the pH of 100 mL of a 0.25 M H2CO3 when 70.0 mL of 0.25 M NaOH are added. Ka1 = 4.3 x 10-7 and Ka2 = 5.6 x 10-11

Example #2: Calculate the pH of 75.0 mL of a 0.10 M of phosphorous acid, H3PO3, when 80.0 mL of 0.15 M NaOH are added. Ka1 = 5.0 x 10-2, Ka2 = 2.0 x 10-7