Ch.6 - Thermochemistry WorksheetSee all chapters
All Chapters
Ch.1 - Intro to General Chemistry
Ch.2 - Atoms & Elements
Ch.3 - Chemical Reactions
BONUS: Lab Techniques and Procedures
BONUS: Mathematical Operations and Functions
Ch.4 - Chemical Quantities & Aqueous Reactions
Ch.5 - Gases
Ch.6 - Thermochemistry
Ch.7 - Quantum Mechanics
Ch.8 - Periodic Properties of the Elements
Ch.9 - Bonding & Molecular Structure
Ch.10 - Molecular Shapes & Valence Bond Theory
Ch.11 - Liquids, Solids & Intermolecular Forces
Ch.12 - Solutions
Ch.13 - Chemical Kinetics
Ch.14 - Chemical Equilibrium
Ch.15 - Acid and Base Equilibrium
Ch.16 - Aqueous Equilibrium
Ch. 17 - Chemical Thermodynamics
Ch.18 - Electrochemistry
Ch.19 - Nuclear Chemistry
Ch.20 - Organic Chemistry
Ch.22 - Chemistry of the Nonmetals
Ch.23 - Transition Metals and Coordination Compounds

Solution: Electrostatic potential energy. At finite separation distances for two charged particles, Eel is positive for like charges and negative for opposite charges. As the particles move farther apart

Problem

A graph has separation distance on the X-axis, ranging from 0 to infinity (unscaled).  The Y-axis is electrostatic potential energy, with increasingly negative values below the X-axis and increasingly positive values above the X-axis. The x-axis is equal to 0.  Lines are shown for like charges (repulsion) and opposite chargers (attraction). For like charges, at smaller separation objects experience greater repulsion (higher potential).  As the distance increases, the potential rapidly decreases and is asymptotic to the X-axis: greater separation results in less repulsion (lower potential). For opposite charges, at smaller separation objects experience greater attraction (lower potential).  As the distance increases, the potential rapidly increases and is asymptotic to the X-axis: greater separation results in less attraction (higher or less negative potential).
Electrostatic potential energy. At finite separation distances for two charged particles, Eel is positive for like charges and negative for opposite charges. As the particles move farther apart, their electrostatic potential energy approaches zero.

A positively charged particle and a negatively charged particle are initially far apart. What happens to their electrostatic potential energy as they are brought closer together?