All Chapters
Ch.1 - Intro to General Chemistry
Ch.2 - Atoms & Elements
Ch.3 - Chemical Reactions
BONUS: Lab Techniques and Procedures
BONUS: Mathematical Operations and Functions
Ch.4 - Chemical Quantities & Aqueous Reactions
Ch.5 - Gases
Ch.6 - Thermochemistry
Ch.7 - Quantum Mechanics
Ch.8 - Periodic Properties of the Elements
Ch.9 - Bonding & Molecular Structure
Ch.10 - Molecular Shapes & Valence Bond Theory
Ch.11 - Liquids, Solids & Intermolecular Forces
Ch.12 - Solutions
Ch.13 - Chemical Kinetics
Ch.14 - Chemical Equilibrium
Ch.15 - Acid and Base Equilibrium
Ch.16 - Aqueous Equilibrium
Ch. 17 - Chemical Thermodynamics
Ch.18 - Electrochemistry
Ch.19 - Nuclear Chemistry
Ch.20 - Organic Chemistry
Ch.22 - Chemistry of the Nonmetals
Ch.23 - Transition Metals and Coordination Compounds

Solution: The North American record for highest recorded barometric pressure is 31.85 inHg, set in 1989 in Northway, Alaska.Convert this pressure to kPa (kilopascals).

Solution: The North American record for highest recorded barometric pressure is 31.85 inHg, set in 1989 in Northway, Alaska.Convert this pressure to kPa (kilopascals).

Problem

The North American record for highest recorded barometric pressure is 31.85 inHg, set in 1989 in Northway, Alaska.

Convert this pressure to kPa (kilopascals).

Solution

We’re being asked to find the barometric pressure in kPa (or kilopascals). The given pressure is in 31.85 inHg (or inches of Hg)


We will perform the following steps to solve the problem:

Step 1: Convert in Hg to mm Hg

Step 2: Convert mm Hg to kPa


Recall that when doing unit conversions:

▪ Put units you need to cancel out on opposite places (if it’s in the numerator then put the conversion factor with the same unit in the denominator)


Step 1: Convert in Hg to mm Hg


We’re going to convert in Hg to mm Hg:

in Hg → cm Hg → m Hg → mm Hg        

Hg does not change so we can do the conversion as:

in → cm → m → mm        


Given: 

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