Ch.13 - Chemical KineticsSee all chapters
All Chapters
Ch.1 - Intro to General Chemistry
Ch.2 - Atoms & Elements
Ch.3 - Chemical Reactions
BONUS: Lab Techniques and Procedures
BONUS: Mathematical Operations and Functions
Ch.4 - Chemical Quantities & Aqueous Reactions
Ch.5 - Gases
Ch.6 - Thermochemistry
Ch.7 - Quantum Mechanics
Ch.8 - Periodic Properties of the Elements
Ch.9 - Bonding & Molecular Structure
Ch.10 - Molecular Shapes & Valence Bond Theory
Ch.11 - Liquids, Solids & Intermolecular Forces
Ch.12 - Solutions
Ch.13 - Chemical Kinetics
Ch.14 - Chemical Equilibrium
Ch.15 - Acid and Base Equilibrium
Ch.16 - Aqueous Equilibrium
Ch. 17 - Chemical Thermodynamics
Ch.18 - Electrochemistry
Ch.19 - Nuclear Chemistry
Ch.20 - Organic Chemistry
Ch.22 - Chemistry of the Nonmetals
Ch.23 - Transition Metals and Coordination Compounds

Solution: Iodine is absorbed by the thyroid. Iodine-131 is radioactive, emitting both gamma rays and beta particles (electrons), so it can be used diagnostically image the thyroid and therapeutically for the treatment of hyperthyroidism. The radioactive decay of iodine-131 follows first-order kinetics with a half-life of 8.02 days. a. What is the rate constant for the decay of iodine-131?   b. Assuming an initial dose of 1.0 x 10 -6 g of iodine-131 absorbed by the thyroid, how much would be left after two weeks?

Problem

Iodine is absorbed by the thyroid. Iodine-131 is radioactive, emitting both gamma rays and beta particles (electrons), so it can be used diagnostically image the thyroid and therapeutically for the treatment of hyperthyroidism. The radioactive decay of iodine-131 follows first-order kinetics with a half-life of 8.02 days.

a. What is the rate constant for the decay of iodine-131?

 

b. Assuming an initial dose of 1.0 x 10 -6 g of iodine-131 absorbed by the thyroid, how much would be left after two weeks?