Ch.11 - Liquids, Solids & Intermolecular ForcesWorksheetSee all chapters
All Chapters
Ch.1 - Intro to General Chemistry
Ch.2 - Atoms & Elements
Ch.3 - Chemical Reactions
BONUS: Lab Techniques and Procedures
BONUS: Mathematical Operations and Functions
Ch.4 - Chemical Quantities & Aqueous Reactions
Ch.5 - Gases
Ch.6 - Thermochemistry
Ch.7 - Quantum Mechanics
Ch.8 - Periodic Properties of the Elements
Ch.9 - Bonding & Molecular Structure
Ch.10 - Molecular Shapes & Valence Bond Theory
Ch.11 - Liquids, Solids & Intermolecular Forces
Ch.12 - Solutions
Ch.13 - Chemical Kinetics
Ch.14 - Chemical Equilibrium
Ch.15 - Acid and Base Equilibrium
Ch.16 - Aqueous Equilibrium
Ch. 17 - Chemical Thermodynamics
Ch.18 - Electrochemistry
Ch.19 - Nuclear Chemistry
Ch.20 - Organic Chemistry
Ch.22 - Chemistry of the Nonmetals
Ch.23 - Transition Metals and Coordination Compounds

Solution: Two important characteristics used to evaluate the risk of fire or explosion are a compound’s lower flammable limit (LFL) and flash point. The LFL is the minimum percentage by volume in air that is ig

Problem

Two important characteristics used to evaluate the risk of fire or explosion are a compound’s lower flammable limit (LFL) and flash point. The LFL is the minimum percentage by volume in air that is ignitable. Below that, the mixture is too “lean” to burn. The flash point is the temperature at which the air over a confined liquid becomes ignitable. n-Hexane boils at 68.7°C at 1 atm. At 20.0°C, its vapor pressure is 121 mmHg. The LFL of n-hexane is 1.1%. Calculate the flash point of n-hexane.