Ch.12 - SolutionsWorksheetSee all chapters
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Ch.1 - Intro to General Chemistry
Ch.2 - Atoms & Elements
Ch.3 - Chemical Reactions
BONUS: Lab Techniques and Procedures
BONUS: Mathematical Operations and Functions
Ch.4 - Chemical Quantities & Aqueous Reactions
Ch.5 - Gases
Ch.6 - Thermochemistry
Ch.7 - Quantum Mechanics
Ch.8 - Periodic Properties of the Elements
Ch.9 - Bonding & Molecular Structure
Ch.10 - Molecular Shapes & Valence Bond Theory
Ch.11 - Liquids, Solids & Intermolecular Forces
Ch.12 - Solutions
Ch.13 - Chemical Kinetics
Ch.14 - Chemical Equilibrium
Ch.15 - Acid and Base Equilibrium
Ch.16 - Aqueous Equilibrium
Ch. 17 - Chemical Thermodynamics
Ch.18 - Electrochemistry
Ch.19 - Nuclear Chemistry
Ch.20 - Organic Chemistry
Ch.22 - Chemistry of the Nonmetals
Ch.23 - Transition Metals and Coordination Compounds

Solution: In the “Méthode Champenoise,” grape juice is fermented in a wine bottle to produce sparkling wine. The reaction isC6H12O6 (aq) → (aq) 2C2H5OH (aq) + 2CO2 (g)Fermentation of 750. mL grape juice (density 5 1.0 g/cm3) is allowed to take place in a bottle with a total volume of 825 mL until 12% by volume is ethanol (C2H5OH). Assuming that the CO2 is insoluble in H2O (actually, a wrong assumption), what would be the pressure of CO2 inside the wine bottle at 25°C (The density of ethanol is 0.79 g/cm3.)The pressure of CO  2 in a bottle of sparkling wine was calculated assuming that the CO2 was insoluble in water. This was a bad assumption. Redo this problem by assuming that CO2 obeys Henry’s law. Use the data given in that problem to calculate the partial pressure of CO2 in the gas phase and the solubility of CO2 in the wine at 25˚C. The Henry’s law constant for CO2 is 3.1 x 10 22 mol/L • atm at 25˚C with Henry’s law in the form  C = kP, where C is the concentration of the gas in mol/L.

Problem

In the “Méthode Champenoise,” grape juice is fermented in a wine bottle to produce sparkling wine. The reaction is

C6H12O(aq) → (aq) 2C2H5OH (aq) + 2CO2 (g)

Fermentation of 750. mL grape juice (density 5 1.0 g/cm3) is allowed to take place in a bottle with a total volume of 825 mL until 12% by volume is ethanol (C2H5OH). Assuming that the CO2 is insoluble in H2O (actually, a wrong assumption), what would be the pressure of CO2 inside the wine bottle at 25°C (The density of ethanol is 0.79 g/cm3.)

The pressure of CO  2 in a bottle of sparkling wine was calculated assuming that the CO2 was insoluble in water. This was a bad assumption. Redo this problem by assuming that CO2 obeys Henry’s law. Use the data given in that problem to calculate the partial pressure of CO2 in the gas phase and the solubility of CO2 in the wine at 25˚C. The Henry’s law constant for CO2 is 3.1 x 10 22 mol/L • atm at 25˚C with Henry’s law in the form  C = kP, where C is the concentration of the gas in mol/L.