Ch.1 - Intro to General ChemistryWorksheetSee all chapters
All Chapters
Ch.1 - Intro to General Chemistry
Ch.2 - Atoms & Elements
Ch.3 - Chemical Reactions
BONUS: Lab Techniques and Procedures
BONUS: Mathematical Operations and Functions
Ch.4 - Chemical Quantities & Aqueous Reactions
Ch.5 - Gases
Ch.6 - Thermochemistry
Ch.7 - Quantum Mechanics
Ch.8 - Periodic Properties of the Elements
Ch.9 - Bonding & Molecular Structure
Ch.10 - Molecular Shapes & Valence Bond Theory
Ch.11 - Liquids, Solids & Intermolecular Forces
Ch.12 - Solutions
Ch.13 - Chemical Kinetics
Ch.14 - Chemical Equilibrium
Ch.15 - Acid and Base Equilibrium
Ch.16 - Aqueous Equilibrium
Ch. 17 - Chemical Thermodynamics
Ch.18 - Electrochemistry
Ch.19 - Nuclear Chemistry
Ch.20 - Organic Chemistry
Ch.22 - Chemistry of the Nonmetals
Ch.23 - Transition Metals and Coordination Compounds

Solution: Distances over land are measured in statute miles (5280 ft), but distances over water are measured in nautical miles, where 1 nautical mile was originally defined as 1 minute of arc along an Earth mer

Problem

Distances over land are measured in statute miles (5280 ft), but distances over water are measured in nautical miles, where 1 nautical mile was originally defined as 1 minute of arc along an Earth meridian, or 1/21600 of the Earths circumference through the poles. A ships speed through the water is measured in knots, where 1 knot = 1 nautical mile per hour. Historically, the unit knot derived from the practice of measuring a ships speed by throwing a log tied to a knotted line over the side. The line had a knot tied in it at intervals of 47 ft. 3 in., and the number of knots run out in 28 seconds was counted to determine speed.

By international agreement, the nautical mile is now defined as exactly 1852 meters. By what percentage does this current definition differ from the original definition?