Ch.2 - Atoms & ElementsWorksheetSee all chapters
All Chapters
Ch.1 - Intro to General Chemistry
Ch.2 - Atoms & Elements
Ch.3 - Chemical Reactions
BONUS: Lab Techniques and Procedures
BONUS: Mathematical Operations and Functions
Ch.4 - Chemical Quantities & Aqueous Reactions
Ch.5 - Gases
Ch.6 - Thermochemistry
Ch.7 - Quantum Mechanics
Ch.8 - Periodic Properties of the Elements
Ch.9 - Bonding & Molecular Structure
Ch.10 - Molecular Shapes & Valence Bond Theory
Ch.11 - Liquids, Solids & Intermolecular Forces
Ch.12 - Solutions
Ch.13 - Chemical Kinetics
Ch.14 - Chemical Equilibrium
Ch.15 - Acid and Base Equilibrium
Ch.16 - Aqueous Equilibrium
Ch. 17 - Chemical Thermodynamics
Ch.18 - Electrochemistry
Ch.19 - Nuclear Chemistry
Ch.20 - Organic Chemistry
Ch.22 - Chemistry of the Nonmetals
Ch.23 - Transition Metals and Coordination Compounds

Solution: In the Millikan oil-drop experiment (see the figure) the tiny oil drops are observed through the viewing lens as rising, stationary, or falling, as shown here. What causes their rate of fall to vary

Problem

In the Millikan oil-drop experiment (see the figure) the tiny oil drops are observed through the viewing lens as rising, stationary, or falling, as shown here.
A diagram showing a field of 5 dots. Two small dots and one large dot move up, while one small and one large dot move down.

What causes their rate of fall to vary from their rate in the absence of an electric field?