Problem: Mass spectrometry is more often applied to molecules than to atoms. We will see in Chapter 3 in the textbook that the  molecular weight  of a molecule is the sum of the atomic weights of the atoms in the molecule. In mass spectrometry, these molecular weights are measured relative to 1/12 the mass of one atom of 12C and therefore are commonly referred to as relative masses. The mass spectrum of H2 is taken under conditions that prevent decomposition into H atoms.The two naturally occurring isotopes of hydrogen are 1H (atomic mass = 1.00783 amu; abundance 99.9885%) and 2H (atomic mass = 2.01410 amu; abundance 0.0115%).Which peak will be the largest?a) first peak (2.01566 amu) b) second peak (3.02193 amu) c) third peak (4.02820 amu)

FREE Expert Solution
View Complete Written Solution
Problem Details

Mass spectrometry is more often applied to molecules than to atoms. We will see in Chapter 3 in the textbook that the  molecular weight  of a molecule is the sum of the atomic weights of the atoms in the molecule. In mass spectrometry, these molecular weights are measured relative to 1/12 the mass of one atom of 12C and therefore are commonly referred to as relative masses. The mass spectrum of H2 is taken under conditions that prevent decomposition into H atoms.

The two naturally occurring isotopes of hydrogen are 1H (atomic mass 1.00783 amu; abundance 99.9885%) and 2H (atomic mass 2.01410 amu; abundance 0.0115%).

Which peak will be the largest?


a) first peak (2.01566 amu) 

b) second peak (3.02193 amu) 

c) third peak (4.02820 amu)

Frequently Asked Questions

What scientific concept do you need to know in order to solve this problem?

Our tutors have indicated that to solve this problem you will need to apply the Mass Spectrometry concept. You can view video lessons to learn Mass Spectrometry. Or if you need more Mass Spectrometry practice, you can also practice Mass Spectrometry practice problems.