Problem: A sample of nickel is heated to 99.8°C and placed in a coffeecup calorimeter containing 150.0 g water at 23.5°C. After the metal cools, the final temperature of metal and water mixture is 25.0°C. If the specific heat capacity of nickel is 0.444 J/°C ? g, what mass of nickel was originally heated? Assume no heat loss to the surroundings.

🤓 Based on our data, we think this question is relevant for Professor Choudhury's class at BC.

FREE Expert Solution

Based on the given system:

The nickel sample and water are in thermal equilibrium:

▪ final temperature silver block = final temperature of water = final temperature of the system

Tf silver = Tf water = 25.0°C

The nickel has an initial temperature of 99.8°C and a final temperature of 25.0°C.

▪ the temperature of the nickel sample decreasedlost heat → – q

The system is in an insulated container, meaning no heat is lost to the surroundings

▪ the heat lost by the silver block is absorbed by water
▪ heat is absorbed by water → + q

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Problem Details

A sample of nickel is heated to 99.8°C and placed in a coffeecup calorimeter containing 150.0 g water at 23.5°C. After the metal cools, the final temperature of metal and water mixture is 25.0°C. If the specific heat capacity of nickel is 0.444 J/°C ? g, what mass of nickel was originally heated? Assume no heat loss to the surroundings.

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What scientific concept do you need to know in order to solve this problem?

Our tutors have indicated that to solve this problem you will need to apply the Calorimetry concept. You can view video lessons to learn Calorimetry. Or if you need more Calorimetry practice, you can also practice Calorimetry practice problems.

What professor is this problem relevant for?

Based on our data, we think this problem is relevant for Professor Choudhury's class at BC.

What textbook is this problem found in?

Our data indicates that this problem or a close variation was asked in Chemistry: An Atoms First Approach - Zumdahl 2nd Edition. You can also practice Chemistry: An Atoms First Approach - Zumdahl 2nd Edition practice problems.