All Chapters
Ch.1 - Intro to General Chemistry
Ch.2 - Atoms & Elements
Ch.3 - Chemical Reactions
BONUS: Lab Techniques and Procedures
BONUS: Mathematical Operations and Functions
Ch.4 - Chemical Quantities & Aqueous Reactions
Ch.5 - Gases
Ch.6 - Thermochemistry
Ch.7 - Quantum Mechanics
Ch.8 - Periodic Properties of the Elements
Ch.9 - Bonding & Molecular Structure
Ch.10 - Molecular Shapes & Valence Bond Theory
Ch.11 - Liquids, Solids & Intermolecular Forces
Ch.12 - Solutions
Ch.13 - Chemical Kinetics
Ch.14 - Chemical Equilibrium
Ch.15 - Acid and Base Equilibrium
Ch.16 - Aqueous Equilibrium
Ch. 17 - Chemical Thermodynamics
Ch.18 - Electrochemistry
Ch.19 - Nuclear Chemistry
Ch.20 - Organic Chemistry
Ch.22 - Chemistry of the Nonmetals
Ch.23 - Transition Metals and Coordination Compounds

Solution: Metallic molybdenum can be produced from the mineral molybdenite, MoS2. The mineral is first oxidized in air to molybdenum trioxide and sulfur dioxide. Molybdenum trioxide is then reduced to metallic

Problem

Metallic molybdenum can be produced from the mineral molybdenite, MoS2. The mineral is first oxidized in air to molybdenum trioxide and sulfur dioxide. Molybdenum trioxide is then reduced to metallic molybdenum using hydrogen gas. The balanced equations are

MoS2(s) + 7/2O2(g) → MoO3(s) + 2SO2(g)

MoO3(s) + 3H2(g) → Mo(s) + 3H2O(l)

Calculate the volumes of air and hydrogen gas at 17°C and 1.00 atm that are necessary to produce 1.00 x 103 kg pure molybdenum from MoS2. Assume air contains 21% oxygen by volume, and assume 100% yield for each reaction.