Ch.7 - Quantum MechanicsWorksheetSee all chapters
All Chapters
Ch.1 - Intro to General Chemistry
Ch.2 - Atoms & Elements
Ch.3 - Chemical Reactions
BONUS: Lab Techniques and Procedures
BONUS: Mathematical Operations and Functions
Ch.4 - Chemical Quantities & Aqueous Reactions
Ch.5 - Gases
Ch.6 - Thermochemistry
Ch.7 - Quantum Mechanics
Ch.8 - Periodic Properties of the Elements
Ch.9 - Bonding & Molecular Structure
Ch.10 - Molecular Shapes & Valence Bond Theory
Ch.11 - Liquids, Solids & Intermolecular Forces
Ch.12 - Solutions
Ch.13 - Chemical Kinetics
Ch.14 - Chemical Equilibrium
Ch.15 - Acid and Base Equilibrium
Ch.16 - Aqueous Equilibrium
Ch. 17 - Chemical Thermodynamics
Ch.18 - Electrochemistry
Ch.19 - Nuclear Chemistry
Ch.20 - Organic Chemistry
Ch.22 - Chemistry of the Nonmetals
Ch.23 - Transition Metals and Coordination Compounds

Solution: Cesium was discovered in natural mineral waters in 1860 by R. W. Bunsen and G. R. Kirchhoff, using the spectroscope they invented in 1859. The name came from the Latin caesius (“sky blue”) because of

Solution: Cesium was discovered in natural mineral waters in 1860 by R. W. Bunsen and G. R. Kirchhoff, using the spectroscope they invented in 1859. The name came from the Latin caesius (“sky blue”) because of

Problem

Cesium was discovered in natural mineral waters in 1860 by R. W. Bunsen and G. R. Kirchhoff, using the spectroscope they invented in 1859. The name came from the Latin caesius (“sky blue”) because of the prominent blue line observed for this element at 455.5 nm. Calculate the frequency and energy of a photon of this light.

Solution

Recall: The energy of a photon is given by the equation:

where h = Planck's constant and v = frequency of light. Frequency and wavelength (λ) are related via the following equation:

where c = speed of light (3.00 x 108 m/s).

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