Problem: A chemical engineer burned 1.520 g of a hydrocarbon in the bomb of a calorimeter (see Figure 6.10). The water temperature rose from 20.00°C to 23.55°C. If the calorimeter had a heat capacity of 11.09 kJ/K, what was the heat released (qV) per gram of hydrocarbon?

FREE Expert Solution

We’re being asked to calculate the heat released (qV) per gram of hydrocarbon in a bomb calorimeter. This is given by the equation:


q = CcalT


where 

Ccal = heat capacity of the calorimeter

m = mass of water (in grams)

ΔT = change in temperature = final T – initial T.


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Problem Details

A chemical engineer burned 1.520 g of a hydrocarbon in the bomb of a calorimeter (see Figure 6.10). The water temperature rose from 20.00°C to 23.55°C. If the calorimeter had a heat capacity of 11.09 kJ/K, what was the heat released (qV) per gram of hydrocarbon?

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What scientific concept do you need to know in order to solve this problem?

Our tutors have indicated that to solve this problem you will need to apply the Constant-Volume Calorimetry concept. You can view video lessons to learn Constant-Volume Calorimetry. Or if you need more Constant-Volume Calorimetry practice, you can also practice Constant-Volume Calorimetry practice problems.

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Based on our data, we think this problem is relevant for Professor Massari's class at UMN.

What textbook is this problem found in?

Our data indicates that this problem or a close variation was asked in Chemistry: The Molecular Nature of Matter and Change - Silberberg 8th Edition. You can also practice Chemistry: The Molecular Nature of Matter and Change - Silberberg 8th Edition practice problems.