Ch.1 - Intro to General ChemistryWorksheetSee all chapters
All Chapters
Ch.1 - Intro to General Chemistry
Ch.2 - Atoms & Elements
Ch.3 - Chemical Reactions
BONUS: Lab Techniques and Procedures
BONUS: Mathematical Operations and Functions
Ch.4 - Chemical Quantities & Aqueous Reactions
Ch.5 - Gases
Ch.6 - Thermochemistry
Ch.7 - Quantum Mechanics
Ch.8 - Periodic Properties of the Elements
Ch.9 - Bonding & Molecular Structure
Ch.10 - Molecular Shapes & Valence Bond Theory
Ch.11 - Liquids, Solids & Intermolecular Forces
Ch.12 - Solutions
Ch.13 - Chemical Kinetics
Ch.14 - Chemical Equilibrium
Ch.15 - Acid and Base Equilibrium
Ch.16 - Aqueous Equilibrium
Ch. 17 - Chemical Thermodynamics
Ch.18 - Electrochemistry
Ch.19 - Nuclear Chemistry
Ch.20 - Organic Chemistry
Ch.22 - Chemistry of the Nonmetals
Ch.23 - Transition Metals and Coordination Compounds

Solution: Asbestos is a fibrous silicate mineral with remarkably high tensile strength. But it is no longer used because airborne asbestos particles can cause lung cancer. Grunerite, a type of asbestos, has a tensile strength of 3.5 x 102 kg/mm2 (thus, a strand of grunerite with a 1-mm 2 cross-sectional area can hold up to 3.5 x 102 kg). The tensile strengths of aluminum and Steel No. 5137 are 2.5 x 104 lb/in2 and 5.0 x 104 lb/in2, respectively. Calculate the cross-sectional areas (in mm2) of wires of aluminum and of Steel No. 5137 that have the same tensile strength as a fiber of grunerite with a crosssectional area of 1.0 μm2.

Solution: Asbestos is a fibrous silicate mineral with remarkably high tensile strength. But it is no longer used because airborne asbestos particles can cause lung cancer. Grunerite, a type of asbestos, has a t

Problem

Asbestos is a fibrous silicate mineral with remarkably high tensile strength. But it is no longer used because airborne asbestos particles can cause lung cancer. Grunerite, a type of asbestos, has a tensile strength of 3.5 x 102 kg/mm2 (thus, a strand of grunerite with a 1-mm 2 cross-sectional area can hold up to 3.5 x 102 kg). The tensile strengths of aluminum and Steel No. 5137 are 2.5 x 104 lb/in2 and 5.0 x 104 lb/in2, respectively. Calculate the cross-sectional areas (in mm2) of wires of aluminum and of Steel No. 5137 that have the same tensile strength as a fiber of grunerite with a crosssectional area of 1.0 μm2.

Solution

First step is to find the mass that a grunerite with a crosssectional area of 1.0 μmcan hold. 

This can be solved by multiplying 1.0 μm2 to the tensile strength and with proper conversion of μm2.to mm2

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