Ch.1 - Intro to General ChemistryWorksheetSee all chapters
All Chapters
Ch.1 - Intro to General Chemistry
Ch.2 - Atoms & Elements
Ch.3 - Chemical Reactions
BONUS: Lab Techniques and Procedures
BONUS: Mathematical Operations and Functions
Ch.4 - Chemical Quantities & Aqueous Reactions
Ch.5 - Gases
Ch.6 - Thermochemistry
Ch.7 - Quantum Mechanics
Ch.8 - Periodic Properties of the Elements
Ch.9 - Bonding & Molecular Structure
Ch.10 - Molecular Shapes & Valence Bond Theory
Ch.11 - Liquids, Solids & Intermolecular Forces
Ch.12 - Solutions
Ch.13 - Chemical Kinetics
Ch.14 - Chemical Equilibrium
Ch.15 - Acid and Base Equilibrium
Ch.16 - Aqueous Equilibrium
Ch. 17 - Chemical Thermodynamics
Ch.18 - Electrochemistry
Ch.19 - Nuclear Chemistry
Ch.20 - Organic Chemistry
Ch.22 - Chemistry of the Nonmetals
Ch.23 - Transition Metals and Coordination Compounds

Solution: An empty vial weighs 55.32 g. (a) If the vial weighs 185.56 g when filled with liquid mercury (d= 13.53g/cm3), what is its volume? (b) How much would the vial weigh if it were filled with the same vol

Solution: An empty vial weighs 55.32 g. (a) If the vial weighs 185.56 g when filled with liquid mercury (d= 13.53g/cm3), what is its volume? (b) How much would the vial weigh if it were filled with the same vol

Problem

An empty vial weighs 55.32 g. (a) If the vial weighs 185.56 g when filled with liquid mercury (d= 13.53g/cm3), what is its volume? (b) How much would the vial weigh if it were filled with the same volume of water (d = 0.997 g/cm3 at 25°C)?

Solution

A) Before we can get the volume, we first have to determine the mass of the mercury inside the vial. We can do this by simply subtracting the mass of the empty vial from the total mass.

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