Ch.6 - Thermochemistry WorksheetSee all chapters
All Chapters
Ch.1 - Intro to General Chemistry
Ch.2 - Atoms & Elements
Ch.3 - Chemical Reactions
BONUS: Lab Techniques and Procedures
BONUS: Mathematical Operations and Functions
Ch.4 - Chemical Quantities & Aqueous Reactions
Ch.5 - Gases
Ch.6 - Thermochemistry
Ch.7 - Quantum Mechanics
Ch.8 - Periodic Properties of the Elements
Ch.9 - Bonding & Molecular Structure
Ch.10 - Molecular Shapes & Valence Bond Theory
Ch.11 - Liquids, Solids & Intermolecular Forces
Ch.12 - Solutions
Ch.13 - Chemical Kinetics
Ch.14 - Chemical Equilibrium
Ch.15 - Acid and Base Equilibrium
Ch.16 - Aqueous Equilibrium
Ch. 17 - Chemical Thermodynamics
Ch.18 - Electrochemistry
Ch.19 - Nuclear Chemistry
Ch.20 - Organic Chemistry
Ch.22 - Chemistry of the Nonmetals
Ch.23 - Transition Metals and Coordination Compounds

Solution: An insulated container is used to hold 43.40 g of water at 35.80 °C. A sample of copper weighing 14.10 g is placed in a dry test tube and heated for 30 minutes in a boiling water bath at 100.10 °C. Th

Problem

An insulated container is used to hold 43.40 g of water at 35.80 °C. A sample of copper weighing 14.10 g is placed in a dry test tube and heated for 30 minutes in a boiling water bath at 100.10 °C. The heated test tube is carefully removed from the water bath with laboratory tongs and inclined so that the copper slides into the water in the insulated container. Given that the specific heat of solid copper is 0.385 J/(g • °C), calculate the maximum temperature of the water in the insulated container after the copper metal is added.