Problem: When a solid dissolves in water, heat may be evolved or absorbed. The  heat of dissolution (dissolving) can be determined using a coffee cup calorimeter. In the laboratory a general chemistry student finds that when  3.50 g of CuSO4 (s) are dissolved in 115.90 g of water, the temperature of the solution  increases from 24.19 to 27.48°C. The heat capacity of the calorimeter (sometimes referred to as the  calorimeter constant) was determined in a separate experiment to be 1.78 J/°C. Based on the student's observation, calculate the enthalpy of dissolution of  CuSO4 (s) in kJ/mol. Assume the specific heat of the solution is equal to the specific heat of water. 

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When a solid dissolves in water, heat may be evolved or absorbed. The  heat of dissolution (dissolving) can be determined using a coffee cup calorimeter. 

In the laboratory a general chemistry student finds that when  3.50 g of CuSO4 (s) are dissolved in 115.90 g of water, the temperature of the solution  increases from 24.19 to 27.48°C. 

The heat capacity of the calorimeter (sometimes referred to as the  calorimeter constant) was determined in a separate experiment to be 1.78 J/°C. 

Based on the student's observation, calculate the enthalpy of dissolution of  CuSO4 (s) in kJ/mol. 

Assume the specific heat of the solution is equal to the specific heat of water. 


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