Ch.8 - Periodic Properties of the ElementsWorksheetSee all chapters
All Chapters
Ch.1 - Intro to General Chemistry
Ch.2 - Atoms & Elements
Ch.3 - Chemical Reactions
BONUS: Lab Techniques and Procedures
BONUS: Mathematical Operations and Functions
Ch.4 - Chemical Quantities & Aqueous Reactions
Ch.5 - Gases
Ch.6 - Thermochemistry
Ch.7 - Quantum Mechanics
Ch.8 - Periodic Properties of the Elements
Ch.9 - Bonding & Molecular Structure
Ch.10 - Molecular Shapes & Valence Bond Theory
Ch.11 - Liquids, Solids & Intermolecular Forces
Ch.12 - Solutions
Ch.13 - Chemical Kinetics
Ch.14 - Chemical Equilibrium
Ch.15 - Acid and Base Equilibrium
Ch.16 - Aqueous Equilibrium
Ch. 17 - Chemical Thermodynamics
Ch.18 - Electrochemistry
Ch.19 - Nuclear Chemistry
Ch.20 - Organic Chemistry
Ch.22 - Chemistry of the Nonmetals
Ch.23 - Transition Metals and Coordination Compounds

Solution: Write ground-state electronic configurations for the following atoms or ions and give the number of unpaired electrons:P(g)                                                                            

Solution: Write ground-state electronic configurations for the following atoms or ions and give the number of unpaired electrons:P(g)                                                                            

Problem

Write ground-state electronic configurations for the following atoms or ions and give the number of unpaired electrons:

P(g)                                                                                   ___   unpaired electrons 

Ti(g)                                                                                   ___   unpaired electrons 

Ni2+(g)                                                                               ___   unpaired electrons 

Solution

For this problem, we first need to write the ground state electron configuration before we can get the number of unpaired electrons. We'll use the condensed noble-gas notation for this problem. This just means that we use the symbol of the nearest noble gas that comes before our element. We use this to represent the first part of the electron configuration.

A) For P(g), we start by finding the noble gas that we'll use and we'll see in the periodic table that it would be Ne. Now we still have to finish the electron configuration since we have more electrons in P. Also note that this is just a neutral element so no need to add or subtract electrons. There would be 5 electrons that would be in excess of Ne so we write the electron configuration as follows:

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