Ch.3 - Chemical ReactionsWorksheetSee all chapters
All Chapters
Ch.1 - Intro to General Chemistry
Ch.2 - Atoms & Elements
Ch.3 - Chemical Reactions
BONUS: Lab Techniques and Procedures
BONUS: Mathematical Operations and Functions
Ch.4 - Chemical Quantities & Aqueous Reactions
Ch.5 - Gases
Ch.6 - Thermochemistry
Ch.7 - Quantum Mechanics
Ch.8 - Periodic Properties of the Elements
Ch.9 - Bonding & Molecular Structure
Ch.10 - Molecular Shapes & Valence Bond Theory
Ch.11 - Liquids, Solids & Intermolecular Forces
Ch.12 - Solutions
Ch.13 - Chemical Kinetics
Ch.14 - Chemical Equilibrium
Ch.15 - Acid and Base Equilibrium
Ch.16 - Aqueous Equilibrium
Ch. 17 - Chemical Thermodynamics
Ch.18 - Electrochemistry
Ch.19 - Nuclear Chemistry
Ch.20 - Organic Chemistry
Ch.22 - Chemistry of the Nonmetals
Ch.23 - Transition Metals and Coordination Compounds

Solution: In molten salt nuclear reactors, the fuel is dissolved as fluoride compounds. One of the ideas being investigated is to use these reactors as “breeder” reactors, which make more nuclear fuel as an iso

Problem

In molten salt nuclear reactors, the fuel is dissolved as fluoride compounds. One of the ideas being investigated is to use these reactors as “breeder” reactors, which make more nuclear fuel as an isotope of uranium. The uranium is produced as UF4, but a small amount of UF3 to prevent corrosion which leaches chromium from the walls of the reactor. For this reason, the properties of UF3 compound are currently being investigated (Inorg. Chem., 2011, 50, 10102–10106). 

UF3 can be prepared from UF4 according to the following reaction: 

3UF4 + Al → 3UF3 + AlF3

Supposed you started with 35 g of UF4 and 3.5 g of Al. 

What is the limiting reagent? And what is the amount of UF3 that can be formed in grams?