Problem: Rank the following solutions from lowest to highest vapor pressure. To rank items as equivalent, overlap them.(1) 10.0 g of potassium acetate KC 2H3O2 in 100.0 mL of water  (2) 20.0 g of sucrose (C12H22O11) in 100.0 mL of water  (3) 20.0 g of glucose (C 6H12O6) in 100.0 mL of water

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We’re being asked to rank the given solutions in order of increasing vapor pressure.


The vapor pressure of a solution is related to the intermolecular forces: a stronger IMF leads to lower vapor pressure. This means the solution with the lowest vapor pressure has the strongest IMF, and vice-versa. 


We’re given the mass of solute and the volume of solvent (water). 

Recall that a solution with higher solute concentration will have a stronger IMF, resulting in lower vapor pressure. Therefore, we need to calculate the osmolarity of each solution, which is given by:


Osmolarity=i×moles of soluteLiters of solution


where i = van’t Hoff factor

Note that all the given volumes are in mL so we need to convert mL to L.


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Problem Details

Rank the following solutions from lowest to highest vapor pressure. To rank items as equivalent, overlap them.

(1) 10.0 g of potassium acetate KC 2H3O2 in 100.0 mL of water

(2) 20.0 g of sucrose (C12H22O11) in 100.0 mL of water

(3) 20.0 g of glucose (C 6H12O6) in 100.0 mL of water

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