Problem: From the Beer-Lambert Law, A=ebcWhere A is absorbance, e is the molar absorbtivity, b is the path length of the sample - that is, the path length of the cuvette in which the sample is contained, and c is the concentration of the compound in solution.If someone measured a certain absorbance from a solution with a known concentration from the spectrometer, and then measured another solution of the same species at the same wavelength in the same spectrometer, is it possible to calculate the concentration of the second substance (which is currently an unknown)?

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We are asked to determine if it's possible to determine the concentration of a certain substance where its absorbance is known and given that a certain absorbance from another substance with a known concentration from the spectrometer is knownBoth measurements were measured under the same wavelength.

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Problem Details

From the Beer-Lambert Law, 

A=ebc

Where A is absorbance, e is the molar absorbtivity, b is the path length of the sample - that is, the path length of the cuvette in which the sample is contained, and c is the concentration of the compound in solution.

If someone measured a certain absorbance from a solution with a known concentration from the spectrometer, and then measured another solution of the same species at the same wavelength in the same spectrometer, is it possible to calculate the concentration of the second substance (which is currently an unknown)?

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What scientific concept do you need to know in order to solve this problem?

Our tutors have indicated that to solve this problem you will need to apply the Calculate Molarity concept. You can view video lessons to learn Calculate Molarity. Or if you need more Calculate Molarity practice, you can also practice Calculate Molarity practice problems.

What professor is this problem relevant for?

Based on our data, we think this problem is relevant for Professor Minto's class at IUPUI.