Ch.3 - Chemical ReactionsWorksheetSee all chapters
All Chapters
Ch.1 - Intro to General Chemistry
Ch.2 - Atoms & Elements
Ch.3 - Chemical Reactions
BONUS: Lab Techniques and Procedures
BONUS: Mathematical Operations and Functions
Ch.4 - Chemical Quantities & Aqueous Reactions
Ch.5 - Gases
Ch.6 - Thermochemistry
Ch.7 - Quantum Mechanics
Ch.8 - Periodic Properties of the Elements
Ch.9 - Bonding & Molecular Structure
Ch.10 - Molecular Shapes & Valence Bond Theory
Ch.11 - Liquids, Solids & Intermolecular Forces
Ch.12 - Solutions
Ch.13 - Chemical Kinetics
Ch.14 - Chemical Equilibrium
Ch.15 - Acid and Base Equilibrium
Ch.16 - Aqueous Equilibrium
Ch. 17 - Chemical Thermodynamics
Ch.18 - Electrochemistry
Ch.19 - Nuclear Chemistry
Ch.20 - Organic Chemistry
Ch.22 - Chemistry of the Nonmetals
Ch.23 - Transition Metals and Coordination Compounds

Solution: The naming of polyatomic anions, while seemingly random, actually does have some rules. Two in particular concern the use of the prefix “bi” , which is used to indicate an extra positive hydrogen, and

Problem

The naming of polyatomic anions, while seemingly random, actually does have some rules. Two in particular concern the use of the prefix “bi” , which is used to indicate an extra positive hydrogen, and the difference between the suffices "ite" and "ate," which is based on number of oxygen atoms ("ite" means one less than "ate"). These are exemplified by the differences between carbonate and bicarbonate and sulfite and sulfate, respectively! Given this, what is the formula of biphosphite?

(A) HP-

(B) (PO4)22-

(C) HPO32-

(D) HPO42-

(E) PO33-