Ch.12 - SolutionsWorksheetSee all chapters
All Chapters
Ch.1 - Intro to General Chemistry
Ch.2 - Atoms & Elements
Ch.3 - Chemical Reactions
BONUS: Lab Techniques and Procedures
BONUS: Mathematical Operations and Functions
Ch.4 - Chemical Quantities & Aqueous Reactions
Ch.5 - Gases
Ch.6 - Thermochemistry
Ch.7 - Quantum Mechanics
Ch.8 - Periodic Properties of the Elements
Ch.9 - Bonding & Molecular Structure
Ch.10 - Molecular Shapes & Valence Bond Theory
Ch.11 - Liquids, Solids & Intermolecular Forces
Ch.12 - Solutions
Ch.13 - Chemical Kinetics
Ch.14 - Chemical Equilibrium
Ch.15 - Acid and Base Equilibrium
Ch.16 - Aqueous Equilibrium
Ch. 17 - Chemical Thermodynamics
Ch.18 - Electrochemistry
Ch.19 - Nuclear Chemistry
Ch.20 - Organic Chemistry
Ch.22 - Chemistry of the Nonmetals
Ch.23 - Transition Metals and Coordination Compounds

Solution: Gunnison Bay, the north arm of Great Salt Lake in Utah has a roughly constant salinity of about 28%. In other words, 100 g of water from Gunnison Bay consists of 28 g of salt and 72 g of water. A. Let's assume that all of the salt in Gunnison Bay is sodium chloride, NaCl, and that we can ignore any molecular solutes (for example, dissolved gases). The coldest day on record for Salt Lake City is -30°F. on February 9. 1933. That's -34°C (you're welcome). Calculate the freezing point temperature of water taken from Gunnison Bay. For water. Kf = 1.86 °C/m and Kb = 0.52 °C/m.              B. The assumption we made in Part A is not a very good one. The salt includes a number of other compounds besides NaCl. Assuming the only other major component is MgCl2, will the freezing point be higher or lower than what you calculated in Part A? 

Problem

Gunnison Bay, the north arm of Great Salt Lake in Utah has a roughly constant salinity of about 28%. In other words, 100 g of water from Gunnison Bay consists of 28 g of salt and 72 g of water.

A. Let's assume that all of the salt in Gunnison Bay is sodium chloride, NaCl, and that we can ignore any molecular solutes (for example, dissolved gases). The coldest day on record for Salt Lake City is -30°F. on February 9. 1933. That's -34°C (you're welcome). Calculate the freezing point temperature of water taken from Gunnison Bay. For water. Kf = 1.86 °C/m and Kb = 0.52 °C/m. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

B. The assumption we made in Part A is not a very good one. The salt includes a number of other compounds besides NaCl. Assuming the only other major component is MgCl2, will the freezing point be higher or lower than what you calculated in Part A?