Ch.15 - Acid and Base EquilibriumWorksheetSee all chapters
All Chapters
Ch.1 - Intro to General Chemistry
Ch.2 - Atoms & Elements
Ch.3 - Chemical Reactions
BONUS: Lab Techniques and Procedures
BONUS: Mathematical Operations and Functions
Ch.4 - Chemical Quantities & Aqueous Reactions
Ch.5 - Gases
Ch.6 - Thermochemistry
Ch.7 - Quantum Mechanics
Ch.8 - Periodic Properties of the Elements
Ch.9 - Bonding & Molecular Structure
Ch.10 - Molecular Shapes & Valence Bond Theory
Ch.11 - Liquids, Solids & Intermolecular Forces
Ch.12 - Solutions
Ch.13 - Chemical Kinetics
Ch.14 - Chemical Equilibrium
Ch.15 - Acid and Base Equilibrium
Ch.16 - Aqueous Equilibrium
Ch. 17 - Chemical Thermodynamics
Ch.18 - Electrochemistry
Ch.19 - Nuclear Chemistry
Ch.20 - Organic Chemistry
Ch.22 - Chemistry of the Nonmetals
Ch.23 - Transition Metals and Coordination Compounds

Solution: Which of the following is a weak acid?A)  H2SO4            B)  HNO3                             C)  HF                                   D)  HBr                                E)  HCl

Solution: Which of the following is a weak acid?A)  H2SO4            B)  HNO3                             C)  HF                                   D)  HBr                                E)  HCl

Problem

Which of the following is a weak acid?

A)  H2SO4            

B)  HNO3                             

C)  HF                                   

D)  HBr                                

E)  HCl

Solution

We’re being asked to identify which among the given acids is a weak acid.


Weak acids are weak electrolytes that don’t completely ionize but instead reach a state of equilibrium. 


However, it’s easier to identify strong acids than familiarize yourself with all the weak acids (since the common strong acids have rules and are relatively fewer).


Strong acids are considered strong electrolytes. They completely dissociate into ions when dissolved in water.

Strong binary acids – paired with a highly electronegative atom

Strong binary acids are:              HCl, HBr, and HI

Strong oxyacids (or oxoacids) - have 2 or more oxygens than hydrogens

Oxyacids → possess H+ ion, connected to nonmetal and oxygen

Common strong oxyacids are:                  HNO3, HClO3, HClO4, H2SO4

Exceptions to the rule are:                            Oxalic acid (H2C2O4and Iodic acid (HIO3)

▪ both have 2 more O than H but are weak acids because carbon and iodine have low electronegativity

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