Problem: Part A. After familiarizing yourself with the simulation, complete the following table that matches geometries, coordination models (notations), and structural features.Drag the appropriate labels to their respective targets.Molecules have predictable geometries that are based on the number of electron groups surrounding the central atom. These molecular geometries are simplified models meant to describe the orientation of the electron domains that surround an atom. When there are no lone pairs of electrons, the geometry is entirely decided by the number of atoms bonded to the central atom.The coordination, which is simply the number of atoms bonded to a central atom, and molecular structure of compounds with a central atom can be represented by the ABn notation. This notation indicates that central atom A is bonded to n B atoms (and not all B atoms have to be the same type of atom). For example, AB4 can represent either CH4 or CH2Cl2. All the molecules depicted in the following simulation have all their valence electrons contained within their single, double, and triple bonds. In other words, there are no lone pairs in this simulation.

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Part A. After familiarizing yourself with the simulation, complete the following table that matches geometries, coordination models (notations), and structural features.

Drag the appropriate labels to their respective targets.

Molecules have predictable geometries that are based on the number of electron groups surrounding the central atom. These molecular geometries are simplified models meant to describe the orientation of the electron domains that surround an atom. When there are no lone pairs of electrons, the geometry is entirely decided by the number of atoms bonded to the central atom.

The coordination, which is simply the number of atoms bonded to a central atom, and molecular structure of compounds with a central atom can be represented by the ABn notation. This notation indicates that central atom A is bonded to n B atoms (and not all B atoms have to be the same type of atom). For example, AB4 can represent either CH4 or CH2Cl2. All the molecules depicted in the following simulation have all their valence electrons contained within their single, double, and triple bonds. In other words, there are no lone pairs in this simulation.

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