Problem: Arrange the following elements from greatest to least tendency to accept an electron.Rank from greatest to least tendency to accept an electron. To rank items as equivalent, overlap them.Na, Mg, Cl, S, SiElectron affinity, Eea, is the change in energy that occurs when an electron is added to a neutral isolated atom. This can be represented by the following equation:X(g) + e− → X−(g)Most electron affinity values are negative because energy is usually released when a neutral atom gains an electron. Eea values become more negative with increasing tendency of the atom to accept an electron and increasing stability of the resulting anion. Eea shows a periodic trend that is related to electron configuration. Elements with less than an octet and with high effective nuclear charge (Zeff) tend to have large negative Eea values. Elements with filled valence shells or subshells and low Zeff tend to have Eea values near zero.

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Arrange the following elements from greatest to least tendency to accept an electron.

Rank from greatest to least tendency to accept an electron. To rank items as equivalent, overlap them.

Na, Mg, Cl, S, Si


Electron affinity, Eea, is the change in energy that occurs when an electron is added to a neutral isolated atom. This can be represented by the following equation:

X(g) + e → X(g)

Most electron affinity values are negative because energy is usually released when a neutral atom gains an electron. Eea values become more negative with increasing tendency of the atom to accept an electron and increasing stability of the resulting anion. Eea shows a periodic trend that is related to electron configuration. Elements with less than an octet and with high effective nuclear charge (Zeff) tend to have large negative Eea values. Elements with filled valence shells or subshells and low Zeff tend to have Eea values near zero.

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