Problem: Part A. PF3Cl2 is a nonpolar molecule. Based on this information, determine the F−P−F bond angle, the Cl−P−Cl bond angle, and the F−P−Cl bond angle.Enter the number of degrees of the F−P−F , Cl−P−Cl , and F−P−Cl bond angles, separated by commas (e.g., 30,45,90)A molecule can be polar or nonpolar depending upon the nature of the bonds and the shape of the molecule. For a molecule that has different outer atoms the molecular symmetry will decide the polarity.If the molecular geometry is such that the dipole moments of each polar bond cancel each other then the molecule is nonpolar.However, if the the molecular geometry is such that the dipole moments of each polar bond don’t cancel each other then the molecule is polar.

FREE Expert Solution
90% (424 ratings)
Problem Details

Part A. PF3Cl2 is a nonpolar molecule. Based on this information, determine the F−P−F bond angle, the Cl−P−Cl bond angle, and the F−P−Cl bond angle.

Enter the number of degrees of the F−P−F , Cl−P−Cl , and F−P−Cl bond angles, separated by commas (e.g., 30,45,90)

A molecule can be polar or nonpolar depending upon the nature of the bonds and the shape of the molecule. For a molecule that has different outer atoms the molecular symmetry will decide the polarity.

If the molecular geometry is such that the dipole moments of each polar bond cancel each other then the molecule is nonpolar.
However, if the the molecular geometry is such that the dipole moments of each polar bond don’t cancel each other then the molecule is polar.

Frequently Asked Questions

What scientific concept do you need to know in order to solve this problem?

Our tutors have indicated that to solve this problem you will need to apply the Bond Angles concept. You can view video lessons to learn Bond Angles. Or if you need more Bond Angles practice, you can also practice Bond Angles practice problems.