Problem: If it takes three "breaths" to blow up a balloon to 1.2 L and each breath supplies the balloon with 0.060 moles of exhaled air, how many moles of air are in a 3.0 L balloon?Express your answer to two decimal places and include the appropriate units.If one had a parking garage that was filled with cars such that each parking spot was occupied, it would make intuitive sense that if we had twice as many cars, the parking garage would need to be twice as big to maintain car density within the garage. But, is the same thing true if one is concerned with gas particles and not cars? The answer is Yes. More than a century ago Italian chemist Amadeo Avogadro postulated that V, the volume of a gas and n, the number of gas particles are directly proportional, when the temperature and pressure are held constant.

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If it takes three "breaths" to blow up a balloon to 1.2 L and each breath supplies the balloon with 0.060 moles of exhaled air, how many moles of air are in a 3.0 L balloon?

Express your answer to two decimal places and include the appropriate units.


If one had a parking garage that was filled with cars such that each parking spot was occupied, it would make intuitive sense that if we had twice as many cars, the parking garage would need to be twice as big to maintain car density within the garage. But, is the same thing true if one is concerned with gas particles and not cars? The answer is Yes. More than a century ago Italian chemist Amadeo Avogadro postulated that V, the volume of a gas and n, the number of gas particles are directly proportional, when the temperature and pressure are held constant.

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What scientific concept do you need to know in order to solve this problem?

Our tutors have indicated that to solve this problem you will need to apply the Chemistry Gas Laws concept. If you need more Chemistry Gas Laws practice, you can also practice Chemistry Gas Laws practice problems.

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