Problem: Move each water molecule (with each having a unique orientation) to the most ideal locations in the depicted scenario such that the strongest combination of electrostatic attractions is occurring.Drag the appropriate water molecule orientations to their respective targets.Solutes are constantly in motion when dissolved in a solvent. While in motion, similar charges on atoms will repel each other (+/+, +/δ+ , δ+/δ+ , –/–, –/δ−, δ−/δ−), whereas opposite charges will attract atoms to each other (+/–, +/δ−, –/δ+, δ+/δ−). The oppositely charged interactions require the least amount of energy, so molecules will predominantly orient in a manner that benefits electrostatic attraction.

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Move each water molecule (with each having a unique orientation) to the most ideal locations in the depicted scenario such that the strongest combination of electrostatic attractions is occurring.

Drag the appropriate water molecule orientations to their respective targets.

Solutes are constantly in motion when dissolved in a solvent. While in motion, similar charges on atoms will repel each other (+/+, +/δ+ , δ++ , –/–, –/δ, δ), whereas opposite charges will attract atoms to each other (+/–, +/δ, –/δ+, δ+). The oppositely charged interactions require the least amount of energy, so molecules will predominantly orient in a manner that benefits electrostatic attraction.

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