Problem: What is the identity of element X from Part B? Express your answer as a chemical symbol.Atomic mass Since the number of neutrons varies in the periodic table, neither then number of neutrons nor the mass number (number of neutrons plus protons) is shown. What we do see is the atomic mass, or a weighted average of all the isotope masses. This is the noninteger listed with an element; it is the number with several decimal places. An element's atomic mass is the weighted average of the isotope masses. In other words, it is an average that takes into account the percentage of each isotope. To find the weighted average, multiply each isotopic mass by its relative abundance and find the sum for each isotope of an element.

🤓 Based on our data, we think this question is relevant for Professor Ow's class at UCLA.

FREE Expert Solution
Problem Details

What is the identity of element X from Part B? 

Express your answer as a chemical symbol.


Atomic mass 

Since the number of neutrons varies in the periodic table, neither then number of neutrons nor the mass number (number of neutrons plus protons) is shown. What we do see is the atomic mass, or a weighted average of all the isotope masses. This is the noninteger listed with an element; it is the number with several decimal places. An element's atomic mass is the weighted average of the isotope masses. In other words, it is an average that takes into account the percentage of each isotope. To find the weighted average, multiply each isotopic mass by its relative abundance and find the sum for each isotope of an element.

Frequently Asked Questions

What scientific concept do you need to know in order to solve this problem?

Our tutors have indicated that to solve this problem you will need to apply the Isotopes concept. You can view video lessons to learn Isotopes. Or if you need more Isotopes practice, you can also practice Isotopes practice problems.

What professor is this problem relevant for?

Based on our data, we think this problem is relevant for Professor Ow's class at UCLA.