Problem: Rank the size of a change in temperature of one degree Fahrenheit, one degree Celsius, and one kelvin. In other words, if a thermometer were to show that the temperature outside increased by these amounts, which change would feel the largest? If any of the options are the same magnitude, stack them above one another.Temperature can be measured using three different scales: Celsius, Fahrenheit, and Kelvin. The Celsius degree (°C) is the common unit of temperature, but most people in the United States use the Fahrenheit degree (°F). The kelvin (K) is used in science. You can convert from one temperature scale to another by using the conversionsThe boiling and freezing points of water are constants. Water boils at 212°F, 100°C, or 373.15 K. Although these temperatures are equivalent, the scales used to measure them are different.Water freezes at 32°F, 0°C, or 273.15 K. Note that these conversions are based on the fact that water will boil or freeze at a certain temperature regardless of the scale used to measure it.

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Rank the size of a change in temperature of one degree Fahrenheit, one degree Celsius, and one kelvin. In other words, if a thermometer were to show that the temperature outside increased by these amounts, which change would feel the largest? If any of the options are the same magnitude, stack them above one another.

Temperature can be measured using three different scales: Celsius, Fahrenheit, and Kelvin. The Celsius degree (°C) is the common unit of temperature, but most people in the United States use the Fahrenheit degree (°F). The kelvin (K) is used in science. You can convert from one temperature scale to another by using the conversions

The boiling and freezing points of water are constants. Water boils at 212°F, 100°C, or 373.15 K. Although these temperatures are equivalent, the scales used to measure them are different.

Water freezes at 32°F, 0°C, or 273.15 K. Note that these conversions are based on the fact that water will boil or freeze at a certain temperature regardless of the scale used to measure it.

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