Constant-Volume Calorimetry Video Lessons

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Problem: When 2.060 g of titanium (molar mass = 47.87 g mol−1) is combusted in a bomb calorimeter, the temperature of the calorimeter increases from 25.00°C to 91.60°C. The heat capacity of the bomb calorimeter was measured to be 9.84 kJ °C−1. Calculate the heat of combustion for one mole of titanium.(A) −0.154 kJ mol−1(B) 1.52 × 104 kJ mol−1(C) −1.52 × 104 kJ mol−1(D) −6.55 × 105 kJ mol−1(E) 6.55 × 105 kJ mol−1

FREE Expert Solution

Establish the calorimetry equation for a bomb calorimeter to determine the heat of combustion of 1 mole of titanium


Heat transferred by combustion can be interpreted as:


heat given by combustion =heat gained by calorimeter

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Problem Details

When 2.060 g of titanium (molar mass = 47.87 g mol−1) is combusted in a bomb calorimeter, the temperature of the calorimeter increases from 25.00°C to 91.60°C. The heat capacity of the bomb calorimeter was measured to be 9.84 kJ °C−1. Calculate the heat of combustion for one mole of titanium.

(A) −0.154 kJ mol−1

(B) 1.52 × 104 kJ mol−1

(C) −1.52 × 104 kJ mol−1

(D) −6.55 × 105 kJ mol−1

(E) 6.55 × 105 kJ mol−1

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