Problem: When 0.550 g of C14H10 (molar mass = 178.22 g mol –1 ) is combusted in a bomb calorimeter that has a water jacket containing 400. g of water, the temperature of the water increases by 10.54 °C (specific heat of water = 4.184 J g–1 °C–1 ). Assuming the heat absorbed by the walls of the calorimeter is negligible, calculate the energy change (ΔE) for the combustion reaction per mole of C14H10.A. –5.43 × 10–2 kJ mol–1B. +17.6 kJ mol–1C. –17.6 kJ mol–1D. –5.70 × 103 kJ mol–1E. +5.70 × 103 kJ mol–1

FREE Expert Solution

We’re being asked to determine the energy of the combustion per mole of C14H10.

We will use the heat released by the sample of steam to calculate the final temperature of the mixture. 

Recall that heat (q) can be calculated using the following equation:

q=mcT

q = heat, J

+qabsorbs heat
–qloses heat

 m = mass (g)
 c = specific heat capacity = J/(g·°C)
 ΔT = Tf – Ti = (°C)


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Problem Details

When 0.550 g of C14H10 (molar mass = 178.22 g mol –1 ) is combusted in a bomb calorimeter that has a water jacket containing 400. g of water, the temperature of the water increases by 10.54 °C (specific heat of water = 4.184 J g–1 °C–1 ). Assuming the heat absorbed by the walls of the calorimeter is negligible, calculate the energy change (ΔE) for the combustion reaction per mole of C14H10.

A. –5.43 × 10–2 kJ mol–1

B. +17.6 kJ mol–1

C. –17.6 kJ mol–1

D. –5.70 × 103 kJ mol–1

E. +5.70 × 103 kJ mol–1

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