Problem: When blowing up an air mattress, the volume increases as you add gas particles. Assuming a fully inflated twin air mattress (22.2 cm × 96.5 cm × 190.5 cm) holds 16.7 moles of air to attain its full size of 409 liters, and it leaks during the night until it has only 368 liters, how many moles of air are still in the mattress come morning? Assume the temperature remains at 25 °C and the pressure at 760 mmHg.A. 1.67 molesB. 408 molesC. 18.6 molesD. 15.0 molesE. 13.6 moles

FREE Expert Solution

Use the chemistry gas laws to calculate the number of moles of air after the volume decreased from 409 L to 368 L where the initial moles are 16.7 moles.

Recall that Avogadro’s Law states that volume is directly proportional to the moles of gas:

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Problem Details

When blowing up an air mattress, the volume increases as you add gas particles. Assuming a fully inflated twin air mattress (22.2 cm × 96.5 cm × 190.5 cm) holds 16.7 moles of air to attain its full size of 409 liters, and it leaks during the night until it has only 368 liters, how many moles of air are still in the mattress come morning? Assume the temperature remains at 25 °C and the pressure at 760 mmHg.

A. 1.67 moles

B. 408 moles

C. 18.6 moles

D. 15.0 moles

E. 13.6 moles

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