Ch.12 - SolutionsWorksheetSee all chapters
All Chapters
Ch.1 - Intro to General Chemistry
Ch.2 - Atoms & Elements
Ch.3 - Chemical Reactions
BONUS: Lab Techniques and Procedures
BONUS: Mathematical Operations and Functions
Ch.4 - Chemical Quantities & Aqueous Reactions
Ch.5 - Gases
Ch.6 - Thermochemistry
Ch.7 - Quantum Mechanics
Ch.8 - Periodic Properties of the Elements
Ch.9 - Bonding & Molecular Structure
Ch.10 - Molecular Shapes & Valence Bond Theory
Ch.11 - Liquids, Solids & Intermolecular Forces
Ch.12 - Solutions
Ch.13 - Chemical Kinetics
Ch.14 - Chemical Equilibrium
Ch.15 - Acid and Base Equilibrium
Ch.16 - Aqueous Equilibrium
Ch. 17 - Chemical Thermodynamics
Ch.18 - Electrochemistry
Ch.19 - Nuclear Chemistry
Ch.20 - Organic Chemistry
Ch.22 - Chemistry of the Nonmetals
Ch.23 - Transition Metals and Coordination Compounds

Solution: Match the following aqueous solutions with the appropriate letter from the column on the right.1. 9.3E-2 m Al(CH3COO)3                          A.Highest boiling point2. 0.14 m (NH 4)2SO4             

Problem

Match the following aqueous solutions with the appropriate letter from the column on the right.

1. 9.3E-2 m Al(CH3COO)3                          A.Highest boiling point
2. 0.14 m (NH 4)2SO4                                  B.Second highest boiling point
3. 0.23 m AgNO3                                         C.Third highest boiling point
4. 0.40 m Sucrose (nonelectrolyte)             D.Lowest boiling point

Solution

We have to rank the given solutions based on their boiling points. We can do so by calculating the boiling points of these solutions.


When a nonvolatile solute is added to a volatile solvent the boiling point of the resulting solution is greater than the boiling point of the pure solvent. This is known as boiling point elevation.


We can calculate boiling point elevation using this formula:


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Where,

i = van ’t Hoff constant

Kb = ebullioscopic constant

m = molality of solution


ΔTb is the difference between the boiling point of solution (T2) and the boiling point of water (T1).


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