Ch.4 - Chemical Quantities & Aqueous ReactionsWorksheetSee all chapters
All Chapters
Ch.1 - Intro to General Chemistry
Ch.2 - Atoms & Elements
Ch.3 - Chemical Reactions
BONUS: Lab Techniques and Procedures
BONUS: Mathematical Operations and Functions
Ch.4 - Chemical Quantities & Aqueous Reactions
Ch.5 - Gases
Ch.6 - Thermochemistry
Ch.7 - Quantum Mechanics
Ch.8 - Periodic Properties of the Elements
Ch.9 - Bonding & Molecular Structure
Ch.10 - Molecular Shapes & Valence Bond Theory
Ch.11 - Liquids, Solids & Intermolecular Forces
Ch.12 - Solutions
Ch.13 - Chemical Kinetics
Ch.14 - Chemical Equilibrium
Ch.15 - Acid and Base Equilibrium
Ch.16 - Aqueous Equilibrium
Ch. 17 - Chemical Thermodynamics
Ch.18 - Electrochemistry
Ch.19 - Nuclear Chemistry
Ch.20 - Organic Chemistry
Ch.22 - Chemistry of the Nonmetals
Ch.23 - Transition Metals and Coordination Compounds

Solution: You have two hypothetical molecular compounds, AX and AY. AX is a strong electrolyte and AY is a weak electrolyte. The compounds undergo the following chemical reactions when added to water.AX(aq) + H

Problem

You have two hypothetical molecular compounds, AX and AY. AX is a strong electrolyte and AY is a weak electrolyte. The compounds undergo the following chemical reactions when added to water.

AX(aq) + H2O(l) → AH2O+ (aq) + X-(aq)

AY(aq) + H2O(l) → AH2O+ (aq) + Y-(aq)


a. Explain how the relative amounts of AX(aq) and AY(aq) would compare if you had a beaker of water with AX and a beaker of water with AY.


b. How would the relative amounts of X-(aq) and Y-(aq) in the two beakers compare? Be sure to explain your answer.

Solution

Determine the classifications of electrolytes and apply the properties to the AX and AY salts

Strong electrolytes

  • Strong electrolyte are salts that completely dissociate. Strong acids and bases are strong electrolytes
  • Examples are strong acids like HCl, HBr, HI, HNO, H2SO4, HClO3 and HClO4
  • Strong bases where it is composed of OH-, H- or O2- paired with Group 1A and 2A (Ca, Sr, and Ba) metals.
  • Soluble ionic compounds are also considered strong electrolytes. 

Weak electrolytes

  • Weak electrolytes are salts that partially dissociate. Weak acids and bases are considered weak electrolytes
  • Weak acids like HNO2, H3PO4 and CH3COOH while weak bases like NH3, Be(OH)2 and Mg(OH)2 are all weak electrolytes
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