Ch.19 - Nuclear ChemistryWorksheetSee all chapters
All Chapters
Ch.1 - Intro to General Chemistry
Ch.2 - Atoms & Elements
Ch.3 - Chemical Reactions
BONUS: Lab Techniques and Procedures
BONUS: Mathematical Operations and Functions
Ch.4 - Chemical Quantities & Aqueous Reactions
Ch.5 - Gases
Ch.6 - Thermochemistry
Ch.7 - Quantum Mechanics
Ch.8 - Periodic Properties of the Elements
Ch.9 - Bonding & Molecular Structure
Ch.10 - Molecular Shapes & Valence Bond Theory
Ch.11 - Liquids, Solids & Intermolecular Forces
Ch.12 - Solutions
Ch.13 - Chemical Kinetics
Ch.14 - Chemical Equilibrium
Ch.15 - Acid and Base Equilibrium
Ch.16 - Aqueous Equilibrium
Ch. 17 - Chemical Thermodynamics
Ch.18 - Electrochemistry
Ch.19 - Nuclear Chemistry
Ch.20 - Organic Chemistry
Ch.22 - Chemistry of the Nonmetals
Ch.23 - Transition Metals and Coordination Compounds

Solution: Which of the following nuclei is likely to have the largest mass defect per nucleon: 11B, 51V, 118Sn, 243Cm?

Problem

A graph shows that binding energy increases rapidly, levels off, and then declines slowly.A graph shows that binding energy increases rapidly, levels off, and then declines slowly. The graph has mass number on the x-axis, ranging from 0 to 240 with intervals of 20, and binding energy per nucleon (10 to the minus twelfth power Joules) ranging from 0 to 1.4 with intervals of 0.2. Stability also increases up the y-axis (unscaled). Fusion (combining nuclei) releases energy at mass numbers below 56 (increases moving up left to right) and fission (splitting nuclei) releases energy at high mass numbers (increases right to left).

Which of the following nuclei is likely to have the largest mass defect per nucleon: 11B, 51V, 118Sn, 243Cm?