Ch.4 - Chemical Quantities & Aqueous ReactionsWorksheetSee all chapters
All Chapters
Ch.1 - Intro to General Chemistry
Ch.2 - Atoms & Elements
Ch.3 - Chemical Reactions
BONUS: Lab Techniques and Procedures
BONUS: Mathematical Operations and Functions
Ch.4 - Chemical Quantities & Aqueous Reactions
Ch.5 - Gases
Ch.6 - Thermochemistry
Ch.7 - Quantum Mechanics
Ch.8 - Periodic Properties of the Elements
Ch.9 - Bonding & Molecular Structure
Ch.10 - Molecular Shapes & Valence Bond Theory
Ch.11 - Liquids, Solids & Intermolecular Forces
Ch.12 - Solutions
Ch.13 - Chemical Kinetics
Ch.14 - Chemical Equilibrium
Ch.15 - Acid and Base Equilibrium
Ch.16 - Aqueous Equilibrium
Ch. 17 - Chemical Thermodynamics
Ch.18 - Electrochemistry
Ch.19 - Nuclear Chemistry
Ch.20 - Organic Chemistry
Ch.22 - Chemistry of the Nonmetals
Ch.23 - Transition Metals and Coordination Compounds

Solution: Iron corrodes to produce rust, Fe2O3, but other corrosion products that can form are Fe(O)(OH), iron oxyhydroxide, and magnetite, Fe3O4.It turns out that there are two different kinds of Fe in magnetite that have different oxidation numbers. Suggest what these oxidation numbers are and what their relative stoichiometry must be, assuming oxygens oxidation number is -2.

Solution: Iron corrodes to produce rust, Fe2O3, but other corrosion products that can form are Fe(O)(OH), iron oxyhydroxide, and magnetite, Fe3O4.It turns out that there are two different kinds of Fe in magneti

Problem

Iron corrodes to produce rust, Fe2O3, but other corrosion products that can form are Fe(O)(OH), iron oxyhydroxide, and magnetite, Fe3O4.

It turns out that there are two different kinds of Fe in magnetite that have different oxidation numbers. Suggest what these oxidation numbers are and what their relative stoichiometry must be, assuming oxygens oxidation number is -2.